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Dominant Narratives of Colonial Hokkaido and Imperial Japan
 
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Dominant Narratives of Colonial Hokkaido and Imperial Japan
Envisioning the Periphery and the Modern Nation-State
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
05 Dec 2012
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£58.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781137289759
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The first literary-cultural studies project on modern Hokkaido, this study examines the problematic ways dominant narratives cast Japanese as the main characters, agents, and even victims of the 'modernization' process, perpetuating a number of intransigent and troubling erasures. Michele M. Mason recasts the commonly dismissed colonial project pursued in Hokkaido during the Meiji era (1868-1912) as a major force in the production of modern Japan's national identity, imperial ideology, and empire. Critical readings of the textual and historical foundations of the (his)stories illustrate how representations of the island's colonization both obfuscate the devastating consequences on the indigenous Ainu and define the nascent nation-state of Japan as a timeless, unified, civilized entity.


Description

The first literary-cultural studies project on modern Hokkaido, this study examines the problematic ways dominant narratives cast Japanese as the main characters, agents, and even victims of the 'modernization' process, perpetuating a number of intransigent and troubling erasures. Michele M. Mason recasts the commonly dismissed colonial project pursued in Hokkaido during the Meiji era (1868-1912) as a major force in the production of modern Japan's national identity, imperial ideology, and empire. Critical readings of the textual and historical foundations of the (his)stories illustrate how representations of the island's colonization both obfuscate the devastating consequences on the indigenous Ainu and define the nascent nation-state of Japan as a timeless, unified, civilized entity.


Reviews


Contents

1. Harvesting History: Modern Narratives for Patriotic Pioneers and the Imperial Military
2. Writing Ainu Out: The 'Nature' of Japanese Colonialism in Hokkaido
3. Penal Colonies and Political Protest: Narrating the Transformation of National Identity and Literature
4. A Pantheon of Promises: Fantasies of Freedom and Capitalist Dreams
5. Contested Sites of an Enduring Colonial Past


Authors

Michele M. Mason is Assistant Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Maryland, USA. Her publications include 'Nanshoku to kokka: hara hōitsuan no anchu seijika' (Male-Male Sexuality and the Modern Japanese Nation: Hara Hōitsuan's Secret Politician) in jendāshigaku, 'Writing Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the 21st Century: A New Generation of Manga' in The Asia Pacific Journal, and 'Empowering the Would-be Warrior: Bushidō and the Gendered Bodies of the Japanese Nation' in Recreating Japanese Men.