To complement and extend the recently published special issue entitled The Herbicide Revolution in Developing Countries, we are pleased to present a series of podcasts from some of our contributors, exploring their articles. We will post each podcast here as they become available. We hope you enjoy them!

The Herbicide Revolution in Developing Countries: Tradeoffs among Productivity, Employment and the Environment
Steven Haggblade (co-Guest Editor of the special issue and Michigan State University), discusses the article he authored with Bart Minten, Carl Pray, Thomas Reardon and David Zilberman in the Herbicides special issue. He provides an overview of the key forces driving global development, diffusion and adoption of herbicides across developed and developing countries. 

Listen here.

Rising Herbicide Use and Its Driving Forces in China

Zhihua Xiao (Peking University and Inner Mongolia Agricultural University) describes how agricultural labor shortages and rising farm wages in China have motivated a five-fold jump in herbicide use since 2005 and how local factories have scaled up production capacity as patent protection has expired for major international herbicide brands, making China one of the world’s largest exporters of generic herbicides. 

Listen here.

The Rapid Expansion of Herbicide Use in Smallholder Agriculture in Ethiopia: Patterns, Drivers, and Implications
Seneshaw Tamru (LICOS-KU Leuven), reviews the rapid growth in herbicide use over the past decade in Ethiopia, exploring patterns of adoption, their causes as well as emerging environmental and regulatory issues.

Listen here.

Causes and Consequences of Increasing Herbicide Use in Mali

Veronique Theriault (Michigan State University), describes how rise farm wages and the growing availability of cheap generic herbicides have triggered rapid, spontaneous herbicide adoption by Malian farmers, who indicate that herbicides enable them to control weeds at 50% of the cost of hiring hand weeding labor.  Under-resourced regulatory agencies have not been able to cope with the rapid surge in herbicide use, leading to growing concerns about the quality and safety of a large number of fraudulent and counterfeit herbicides now available. 

Listen here.