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Palgrave Macmillan

Desegregating Chicago's Public Schools

Policy Implementation, Politics, and Protest, 1965-1985

ISBN 9781137360915
Publication Date January 2014
Formats Hardcover Ebook (EPUB) Ebook (PDF) 
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
Series Historical Studies in Education

With the dual impetus of Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Chicago, like so many other cities, began the process of desegregating its public school system. What resulted was a unique study in the implementation and transformation of public policy, as the city dealt with and pushed back against directives and lawsuits from both the state and federal governments. In this book, Dionne Danns provides the story of how public policy on this historic topic was formed by stakeholders at all levels, from superintendents to parents to state and federal officials, and how politics and stakeholder perceptions and protests determined outcomes for the school system.

Dionne Danns is Associate Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and Adjunct in African American and African Diaspora Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, USA. She is the author of Something Better for Our Children: Black Organizing in Chicago Public Schools, 1963-1971.

Introduction
1. Redmond's School Desegregation Plan and Reactions
2. Faculty Desegregation, 1969-1981
3. State Involvement with Student Desegregation, 1971-1979
4. Federal Involvement with Student Desegregation
5. Chicago Desegregates Predominantly White Schools
Conclusion
Appendix

Reviews

. . . Desegregating Chicago's Public Schools . . . is solidly researched and accessibly written . . . No book covers this topic . . . That attention alone makes it invaluable and worthy of publication. The research itself is thorough; the author has uncovered sources that no one else has used in the past to tell a new story.' – Amanda Seligman, Associate Professor of History and Urban Studies, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA
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