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Palgrave Macmillan

Female Football Fans

Community, Identity and Sexism

ISBN 9781137398192
Publication Date April 2014
Formats Hardcover Ebook (EPUB) Ebook (PDF) 
Publisher Palgrave Pivot

Most sociological work on football fandom has focused on the 'malestream', i.e. the experience of men, and it usually talks about socially 'deviant' behaviours, such as alcohol, fighting and general hooliganism.
Yet there have always been female fans of football – even if they have been ignored or written out of the literature. This book shows that there are some unique facets of female experience, including a strong engagement with the new cooperative supporters' trust movement, and fascinating negotiations of identity within this male-dominated world. It draws upon in-depth responsive interviews to put together a broad picture of women's experiences of men's professional football in England.

Carrie Dunn is a journalist and a Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. Her recent books include Spandex, Screw Jobs and Cheap Pops: Inside the Business of British Pro Wrestling.

1. Introduction

2. Background to the Research

3. The Female Fan's Relationships within her Family and Fan Community from Childhood to Adulthood

4. Some Patterns of Female Fans' Supporting Performances and Behaviour

5. Female Fans' Experience of the Significance of the Supporters' Trust Movement

6. The Perception of Female Football Fans' Practices by Clubs and Authorities

7. Looking to the Future

Reviews

'Carrie Dunn's book shows that there are some unique facets of the female football fan experience, including a strong engagement with the new cooperative supporters' trust movement, and fascinating negotiations of identity within this male-dominated world. [This book] will challenge readers to think about the fluid nature of identity, behaviour and practice, not just for individual communities but for their institutions as well.'- LSE Review of Books
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