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Palgrave Macmillan

Gender Inequality in the Public Sector in Pakistan

Representation and Distribution of Resources

ISBN 9781137426468
Publication Date August 2014
Formats Hardcover Ebook (EPUB) Ebook (PDF) 
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan

As gender training is applied increasingly as a development solution to gender inequality, this book examines gender inequality in Pakistan's public sector and questions whether a singular focus on gender training is enough to achieve progress in a patriarchal institutional context. It points to the significance of a parallel procees of critical understanding and interventions that improve women's equitable representation and redistribute resource

Khalid Chauhan has over eighteen years of experience in public service. He is the former Director General of the Pakistan Planning and Management Insitute, Planning Gommision, Government of Pakistan. He holds a PhD in Gender and Development Studies from Australian National University.



Contents
Acknowledgements
Abstract
Tables
Boxes, Map and Appendices
Abbreviations
PART I: INTRODUCTION
1. Introduction
2. Research Issues
3. Issue of Representation
4. Access to Resources
5. Institutional Practices
6. Book Questions
7. Scope of the Book
8. Methodology
9. Data Collection and Analysis
10. Limitations of the Study
11. Organisation of the Book
PART II: GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT
12. Introduction
13. Women in Development: The Politics of Integration
14. Power Neutrality
15. Women and Development: The Politics of Recognition and Access
16. Power Partiality and Materiality
17. Gender and Development: The Politics of Transformation
18. Constraints to Transformation
19. Patriarchy
20. The Political Use of Notion of Sexuality
21. State as the Rule Setter
22. Occupational Closure
23. Religion and Region
24. Some Approaches to Break the Patriarchal Trap
25. Empowerment through Credit Facilitation, not Justice
26. Need for Institutional Reforms
27. Conclusion
PART III: FROM GENDER MAINSTREAMING TO TRAINING
28. Mainstreaming as a Concept
29. Training as an Approach
30. Knowledge as a Tool
31. Knowledge Transfer Sessions
32. Training: Missing Socio-political Context
33. Training: Missing Organisational Context
34. Conclusion
PART IV: PATRIARCHAL PAKISTAN-WOMEN'S REPRESENTATION, ACCESS
TO RESOURCES AND INSTITUTIONAL PRACTICES
35. Introduction
36. Women's Representation
37. The State and the Policies of Representation of Women
38. The Political and Historical Context of Women's Under-representation
39. The Issue of Women's Access to Resources
40. The Social Connection in Access to Resources
41. Access to Education
42. Low Demand for and Poor Supply of Education
43. Demand and Supply of Education in Azad Jammu and Kashmir
44. Access to Education beyond Demand and Supply
45. The Issue of Public Sector Policies and Practices in Pakistan
46. Sexual Harassment in the Workplace
47. The United Nations Development Program
48. Conclusion
PART V: THE RESULTS: ECHOES OF PATRIARCHAL BENOVELACE, FIERCE
RESISTANCE TO EQUALITY AND INSTITUTIONAL INERTIA
49. Introduction
50. Attitudes towards Representation of Women in the Public Sector
51. Attitudes towards Representation: Role of Socio-political Context
52. Attitudes towards Representation: Role of Organisation
53. Attitudes towards Extent of Quotas: Role of Training in Level of Employees
54. Attitudes towards Access to Resources
55. Attitudes towards Identification of Changes Needed: Influence of Training on
56. Cases of Discrimination Processed: Role of Gender
57. Sexual Harassment in the Public Sector: Role of Organisations
PART VI: GENDER INEQUALITY: THE EFFECT OF PATRIARCHY
58. Introduction
59. Representation of Women
PART VII: CONCLUSION
References
Appendices

Reviews

"Chauhan's work is a timely contribution to the existing literature on Gender Inequality in Pakistan as it touches the root cause of the problem. His analysis goes beyond the usual NGO mantra of gender sensitization workshops as a panacea to gender inequality. Public policies hold the key to the changes from within, and Chauhan has substantiated that the problem lies with the patriarchal public sector that continues to support the status quo." - Tahmina Rashid, Qatar University
Addressing deeply entrenched discrimination against women has been on the international development agenda for four decades. Despite some progress, shocking levels gender-based inequality remain. In Pakistan, the challenges are particularly acute. Khalid Chauhan confronts us with those challenges and demands that we rethink the ways in which gender inequality is addressed. Gender Inequality in the Public Sector in Pakistan an important book for all those with a commitment to gender equality, social justice and good governance. It deserves to be read.-
Sharon Bessell, Australian National University
"Chauhan presents Pakistan as a crucial case of gender inequality in the public sector. The mere five percent of women in Pakistan's public workforce mirrors enormous gender inequality elsewhere in the society. Chauhan traces the adoption of `gender training' as a principal strategy for dealing with gender inequality, part of the call in development work to `get institutions right.' The book convincingly shows the gross inadequacy of gender training as main means of dealing with forms of gender inequality that are structural and deeply entrenched." - Patrick Kilby, Australian National Univeristy
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