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Urban Life in the Middle Ages
 
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Urban Life in the Middle Ages
1000-1450
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
07 Nov 2001
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£70.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780333712481
||
 
 
07 Nov 2001
|
£25.99
|Paperback In Stock
  
9780333712498
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

What was life like in towns and cities in medieval Europe? How did people live, and why was it that some towns grew into major urban centres while others did not?
After the year 1000, all across Europe urban life prospered as it had never done before. New towns emerged, and established towns and cities grew larger and became more powerful and dominant. During the later Middle Ages these towns and cities were the focus of religious, political, commercial and social activity; the places where power, profit, piety and people all came together. Urban life was indeed the making of medieval Europe.
Drawing upon original research, as well as the work of medieval historians, urban archaeologists and historical geographers, Keith Lilley explores the close relationship that existed between the life of towns in the Middle Ages and the life within towns. Taking a fresh and challenging approach, this richly-illustrated book will be invaluable to anyone interested in medieval Europe. It focuses on important themes, including lordship, property, and townscape, and explores the processes which not only shaped the towns and cities of medieval Europe, but also the people who lived in them.


Description

What was life like in towns and cities in medieval Europe? How did people live, and why was it that some towns grew into major urban centres while others did not?
After the year 1000, all across Europe urban life prospered as it had never done before. New towns emerged, and established towns and cities grew larger and became more powerful and dominant. During the later Middle Ages these towns and cities were the focus of religious, political, commercial and social activity; the places where power, profit, piety and people all came together. Urban life was indeed the making of medieval Europe.
Drawing upon original research, as well as the work of medieval historians, urban archaeologists and historical geographers, Keith Lilley explores the close relationship that existed between the life of towns in the Middle Ages and the life within towns. Taking a fresh and challenging approach, this richly-illustrated book will be invaluable to anyone interested in medieval Europe. It focuses on important themes, including lordship, property, and townscape, and explores the processes which not only shaped the towns and cities of medieval Europe, but also the people who lived in them.


Reviews

'This is an excellent introduction to urban studies, from a novel perspective - it is the first book on medieval towns to give the urban space proper attention, and the only one I know to take a cultural history perspective.' - Professor Christopher Dyer, University of Leicester

'An original approach to urban history - especially at undergraduate level. Refreshing, clear and well explained - with a good selection of comparative examples.' - S. Rees Jones, University of York

'...an excellent introductory survey which would be ideal for students.' - Elizabeth Freeman, University of Tasmania, Paregon 20.1

'Urban Life proves to be a pleasant introduction to medieval history, as the author successfully synthesizes older and modern reaserch.' - Prof. Dr. Albrecht Classen, University of Arizona, USA


Contents

Preface
Introduction
Urban Legacies
Institutional Urbanism
Geographies of Urban Law
Lordship and Urbanisation
Urban Landscapes
Urban Property and Landholding
Townspeople and Townscapes
Conclusion
Glossary
References
Index


Authors

KEITH D. LILLEY is currently lecturer in human geography at Queen's University, Belfast. Previously he held a British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Royal Holloway (University of London). His work focuses on the built form of medieval towns and cities, particularly their planning and design.