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Irish and Postcolonial Writing
 
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Irish and Postcolonial Writing
Edited by Glenn Hooper and Colin Graham
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
10 Jul 2002
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£87.00
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Cutting across geographical boundaries, literary genres and historical periods, Irish & Postcolonial Writing examines the complex, sometimes contested legacy of Ireland's postcolonial history. From the Act of Union to the present day, these essays consider how Irish writing responded to the history of colonial contact, in what ways in drew on the experience of other cultures, and
how those comparative histories were translated and utilised. Opening with a number of essays dealing with the theoretical implications of a postcolonial reading of Ireland, the book's three-part structure then presents a series of comparative essays which appraise Ireland in relation to the Caribbean, the Orient, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Nigeria, while a final section offers a number of readings of twentieth century writers. Underlining the necessity for an integration of history, theory and practice, these essays examine a range of influences and interconnections, with contributors engaging with debates
within cultural and gender studies, historiography, and nationalism. A much needed response to the expanding interest in Irish and Postcolonial studies, this essay collection brings together the work of several established
as well as younger scholars.


Description

Cutting across geographical boundaries, literary genres and historical periods, Irish & Postcolonial Writing examines the complex, sometimes contested legacy of Ireland's postcolonial history. From the Act of Union to the present day, these essays consider how Irish writing responded to the history of colonial contact, in what ways in drew on the experience of other cultures, and
how those comparative histories were translated and utilised. Opening with a number of essays dealing with the theoretical implications of a postcolonial reading of Ireland, the book's three-part structure then presents a series of comparative essays which appraise Ireland in relation to the Caribbean, the Orient, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Nigeria, while a final section offers a number of readings of twentieth century writers. Underlining the necessity for an integration of history, theory and practice, these essays examine a range of influences and interconnections, with contributors engaging with debates
within cultural and gender studies, historiography, and nationalism. A much needed response to the expanding interest in Irish and Postcolonial studies, this essay collection brings together the work of several established
as well as younger scholars.


Reviews

'Irish and Postcolonial Writing is a helpful exploration of postcolonial theory.... it vindicates its utility as a critical method in Irish Studies'. - David Dwan, Queen's University, Belfast


Contents

PART I: THEORIES
Introduction; G.Hooper
A Diseased Propensity: Fetish and Liminality in the Irish 'Colonial' Text; C.Graham
Frantz Fanon, Roger Casement and Colonial Commitment; R.Kirkland
Demythologizing Ireland: Revisionism and the Irish Colonial Experience; S.Mustafa
PART II: COMPARISONS
Settler Instability: Edgeworth's Irish Novels and Settler Writings from Zimbabwe; T.McLoughlin
Translations: Difference and Identity in Recent Poetry from Ireland and the West Indies; S.Matthews
'Monstrous Fruit': Excremental Visions in Postcolonial Irish and African Fiction; J.Esty
Orientalism and Celticism; L.Innes
Talking about Revolution: Lady Anne Barnard in France, Ireland, and the Cape Colony; D.Johnson
PART III: READINGS
'What is my Culture? Who Talks of my Culture?:' Interrogating Irishness in the Works of James Joyce; M.Tymoczko
Eavan Boland: Forging a Post-Colonial Herstory; S.Fulford
Troublesome Tales: J.G.Farrell and the Decline of Empire; G.Hooper
Bibliography
Index


Authors

GLENN HOOPER is Research Fellow in the Institute of Irish and Scottish Studies at the University of Aberdeen. He is co-editor of Ireland in the Nineteenth Century: Regional Identity and editor of Harriet Martineau's Letters from Ireland and The Tourist's Gaze: Travellers to Ireland, 1800-2000.

COLIN GRAHAM is Lecturer in Irish Writing at Queen's University, Belfast. He is co-editor (with Richard Kirkland) of Ireland and Cultural Theory and author of Ideologies of Epic and Deconstructing Ireland.