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Literature, Politics and Law in Renaissance England
 
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Literature, Politics and Law in Renaissance England
Edited by Erica Sheen and Lorna Hutson
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
30 Nov 2004
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£73.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780333983997
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

For the last twenty years, new historicism has encouraged the analysis of Renaissance literary texts as performances of power and subjection. But there has been no critical debate about how the specific workings of English juridical power and knowledge might relate to literary and theatrical forms. This collection is the first of its kind to attempt a more detailed analysis of the complex interdependencies of legal and literary discourses in Renaissance England. The essays in this collection approach key topics in current debates in Renaissance literature and culture from new and dazzlingly illuminating vantage points. Featuring here are essays on the unconscious spiritual repressions of the English common law; relations between authorship, censorship, treason and the common law; collusions between law and masculinity in theatre; legal discourses of homicide and sudden anger; women's voices in the revolutionary discourses of legal citizenship. Contributors include Peter Goodrich, Alan Stewart, Sue Wiseman and David Colcough amongst others, and these exciting original essays will be of interest to all students and scholars of Renaissance literary and cultural studies.


Description

For the last twenty years, new historicism has encouraged the analysis of Renaissance literary texts as performances of power and subjection. But there has been no critical debate about how the specific workings of English juridical power and knowledge might relate to literary and theatrical forms. This collection is the first of its kind to attempt a more detailed analysis of the complex interdependencies of legal and literary discourses in Renaissance England. The essays in this collection approach key topics in current debates in Renaissance literature and culture from new and dazzlingly illuminating vantage points. Featuring here are essays on the unconscious spiritual repressions of the English common law; relations between authorship, censorship, treason and the common law; collusions between law and masculinity in theatre; legal discourses of homicide and sudden anger; women's voices in the revolutionary discourses of legal citizenship. Contributors include Peter Goodrich, Alan Stewart, Sue Wiseman and David Colcough amongst others, and these exciting original essays will be of interest to all students and scholars of Renaissance literary and cultural studies.


Contents

List of Illustrations
Notes on Contributors
Introduction: Renaissance, Law and Literature; E.Sheen & L.Hutson
Amici curiae: Lawful Manhood and Other Juristic Performances in Renaissance England; P.Goodrich
Instigating Treason: The Life and Death of Henry Cuffe, Secretary; A.Stewart
'Unmanly indignities': Adultery, Evidence and Judgement in Heywood's A Woman Killed With Kindness; S.Mukherji
'She has that in her belly will dry up your ink': Femininity as Challenge in the 'equitable drama' of John Webster; I.Habermann
Renaissance Tool Abuse and the Legal History of the Sudden; L.Wilson
Taking Liberties: George Wither's A Satyre, Libel and the Law; M.O'Callaghan
Freedom of Speech, Libel and the Law in Early Stuart England; D.Colclough
John Selden among the Quakers: Antifeminism and the Seventeenth Century Tithes Controversy; M.Nevitt
Martyrdom in a Merchant World: Law and Martyrdom in the Restoration Memoirs of Elizabeth Jekyll and Mary Love; S.Wiseman
Index


Authors

ERICA SHEEN is Lecturer in English Literature, Film and Literary Theory at the University of Sheffield, UK. Recent publications include studies of Shakespeare and David Lynch; her book The Best in this Kind: Shakespeare and the Institution of Theatre is forthcoming.

LORNA HUTSON is Professor of English Literature at the University of St. Andrews. UK, having until recently taught at the University of California Berkeley. Her books include The Usurer's Daughter (1994) and (with Victoria Kahn) Rhetoric and Law in Early Modern Europe (2001).