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Imperial Hygiene
 
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Imperial Hygiene
A Critical History of Colonialism, Nationalism and Public Health
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
11 Nov 2003
|
£80.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403904881
||
 
 
01 Jul 2014
|
£19.99
|Paperback Not Yet Published
  
9781137429216
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

This book is a cultural history of borders, hygiene and race. It is about foreign bodies: from Victorian vaccines to the pathologised interwar immigrant; from smallpox quarantine to the leper colony; from sexual hygiene to national hygiene to imperial hygiene. Taking British colonialism and White Australia as case-studies, the book examines the enclosures, boundaries and borders which were the objects and means of public health, as well as of colonial, national and racial administration between 1850 and 1950. If public health was in part about segregation (of the diseased from the clean, the fit from the unfit, the immune from the vulnerable), so was race a segregative practice in the modern period. Colonial management of race dovetailed with public health into new boundaries of rule, into racialised cordons sanitaires.


Description

This book is a cultural history of borders, hygiene and race. It is about foreign bodies: from Victorian vaccines to the pathologised interwar immigrant; from smallpox quarantine to the leper colony; from sexual hygiene to national hygiene to imperial hygiene. Taking British colonialism and White Australia as case-studies, the book examines the enclosures, boundaries and borders which were the objects and means of public health, as well as of colonial, national and racial administration between 1850 and 1950. If public health was in part about segregation (of the diseased from the clean, the fit from the unfit, the immune from the vulnerable), so was race a segregative practice in the modern period. Colonial management of race dovetailed with public health into new boundaries of rule, into racialised cordons sanitaires.


Contents

List of Figures
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction: Lines of Hygiene, Boundaries of Rule
Vaccination: Foreign Bodies, Contagion and Colonialism
Smallpox: The Spaces and Subjects of Public Health
Tuberculosis: Governing Healthy Citizens
Leprosy: Segregation and Imperial Hygiene
Quarantine: Imagining the Geo-Body of a Nation
Foreign Bodies: Immigration, International Hygiene and White Australia
Sex: Public Health, Social Hygiene and Eugenics
Conclusion
Notes
Select Bibliography


Authors

ALISON BASHFORD is a historian at the University of Sydney, Australia. She has published widely on the cultural history of modern medicine, including Purity and Pollution: Gender, Embodiment and Victorian Medicine, Contagion: Historical and Cultural Studies (co-edited with Claire Hooker), and Isolation: Places and Practices of Exclusion (co-edited with Carolyn Strange).