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Dante and the Romantics
 
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Dante and the Romantics
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
30 Sep 2004
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£73.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781403932334
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

The British Romantic poets were among the first to realise the centrality of the Divine Comedy for the evolution of the European epic. This study explores the significance of Dante for Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Keats and William Blake. What was their idea of Dante? Why did they feel the need to approach his Christian epic on the afterlife? This study aims to answer these questions by focusing on the three poets' preoccupation with form and language.


Description

The British Romantic poets were among the first to realise the centrality of the Divine Comedy for the evolution of the European epic. This study explores the significance of Dante for Percy Bysshe Shelley, John Keats and William Blake. What was their idea of Dante? Why did they feel the need to approach his Christian epic on the afterlife? This study aims to answer these questions by focusing on the three poets' preoccupation with form and language.


Contents

Acknowledgements
List of Illustrations
Introduction
PART ONE: (PRE)-ROMANTIC RECEPTIONS OF DANTE
The Eighteenth-Century Reception: Dante and Visual Culture
The Romantic Translation of the Divine Comedy: Henry Francis Cary's The Vision
Dante and High Culture: The Romantic Search for the Epic
PART TWO: ROMANTIC PALIMPSESTS
'L'amor che move il sole e l'altre stelle': Shelley on Dante and Love
John Keats and Dante: Speaking the Gods' Language
William Blake: The Illustrator of Dante
Works Cited and Select Bibliography
Index


Authors

ANTONELLA BRAIDA is Lecturer in Italian at the University of Durham. She is co-editor of Image and Word: Reflections of Art and Literature from the Middle Ages to Present (2003).