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Agatha Christie
 
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Agatha Christie
Investigating Femininity
 
Series: Crime Files
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
10 Oct 2006
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£65.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403941718
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Far from being a conservative writer endorsing women's domestic role, Agatha Christie's books depict women as adventurous and independent, renegotiating sexual relationships along more equal lines. Career women, wives who abandon their families and even mistresses may be seen positively. Women are also allowed the dangerous competency to disrupt society, both from a swashbuckling sense of adventure and for more sinister motives, and yet the texts refuse to see them as double deviant because of their femininity. Unlike much of the criticism which chooses to focus on a few canonical texts, this detailed textual analysis of Christie's oeuvre demonstrates exactly how quietly innovatory Christie was in relation to gender, beginning in nineteen twenty and concluding in the early seventies. Makinen questions a reputation based solely as the supreme puzzle-plotter, suggesting that Christie's literary innovations in relation to femininity are important.


Description

Far from being a conservative writer endorsing women's domestic role, Agatha Christie's books depict women as adventurous and independent, renegotiating sexual relationships along more equal lines. Career women, wives who abandon their families and even mistresses may be seen positively. Women are also allowed the dangerous competency to disrupt society, both from a swashbuckling sense of adventure and for more sinister motives, and yet the texts refuse to see them as double deviant because of their femininity. Unlike much of the criticism which chooses to focus on a few canonical texts, this detailed textual analysis of Christie's oeuvre demonstrates exactly how quietly innovatory Christie was in relation to gender, beginning in nineteen twenty and concluding in the early seventies. Makinen questions a reputation based solely as the supreme puzzle-plotter, suggesting that Christie's literary innovations in relation to femininity are important.


Contents

Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Introduction
Preliminary Proceedings
Detecting Deviancy
Available Femininities
Women Behaving Badly
Representing Women of Violence
An Examination of Otherness
Endnotes
Bibliography
Index


Authors

MERJA MAKINEN is Principal Lecturer in English Literary Studies, Middlesex University, UK, and former Programme Tutor for the MA in Popular Literary Fictions. She has published on feminist writing in the Twentieth-century (especially on Angela Carter and Jeanette Winterson) and on popular genre fiction, including detective and crime writing.