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Imagining Contagion in Early Modern Europe
 
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Imagining Contagion in Early Modern Europe
Edited by Claire L. Carlin
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
26 Oct 2005
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£74.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781403939265
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

In this volume, specialists in social and cultural history, early modern literature, philosophy and art history come together to explore the intersection between the material and the metaphorical at time when emerging scientific discovery coexisted with traditional beliefs. An examination of the evolving knowledge, fears and desires of the 15th and 18th centuries can help us reflect on the 21st century preoccupation with contagious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, West Nile virus, Norwalk virus and the new strain of AIDS. The idea of contagion generates poweful metaphors that colour religious, political and artistic discourse. But during that early modern era, words and images take on literal force: in church or at home reading novels, in the political arena or while travelling, disease shows up in and on bodies under the influence of language.


Description

In this volume, specialists in social and cultural history, early modern literature, philosophy and art history come together to explore the intersection between the material and the metaphorical at time when emerging scientific discovery coexisted with traditional beliefs. An examination of the evolving knowledge, fears and desires of the 15th and 18th centuries can help us reflect on the 21st century preoccupation with contagious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, West Nile virus, Norwalk virus and the new strain of AIDS. The idea of contagion generates poweful metaphors that colour religious, political and artistic discourse. But during that early modern era, words and images take on literal force: in church or at home reading novels, in the political arena or while travelling, disease shows up in and on bodies under the influence of language.


Contents

Introduction; C.L.Carlin
PART I: THEORY
Fracastoro's De Contagione and Medieval Reflection on 'Action at a Distance': Old and New Trends in the Renaissance Discourse on the Plague; I.Pantin
The Animism of Ambient Air at the End of the Middle Ages; C.Gagnon
Windows on Contagion; D.Beecher
Contagions of Love: Textual Transmission; N.M.Frelick
The Devil's Curses: The Demonic Origin of Disease in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries; M.Closson
PART II: PRACTICE
Apples and Moustaches: Montaigne's Grin in the Face of Infection; H.Cazes
Contagion, Honour and Urban Life in Early Modern Germany; M.L.Hammond
Corruptible Bodies and Contaminating Technologies: Jesuit Devotional Print and the 1656 Plague in Naples; R.M.San Juan
Quarantine and Caress; F.Charbonneau
The Preaching Disease: Contagious Ecstasy in 18th-Century Sweden; D.Lindmark
PART III: PROJECTION
A Contagion at the Source of Discourse on Sexualities: Syphilis during the French Resistance; G.Poirier
Contagious Laughter and the Burlesque: From the Literal to the Metaphorical; D.Bertrand
The Pathology of Reading: The Novel as an Agent of Contagion; M.Fournier
Religious Contagion in Mid-Seventeenth Century England; N.Greenspan
Contagion by Conceit: Menstruosity and the Rhetoric of Smallpox into the Age of Innoculation; D.Shuttleton
An Afterword on Contagion; D.Beecher
General Bibliography


Authors

CLAIRE L. CARLIN is Associate Professor of French and Associate Dean of Humanities at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. She is the author of Pierre Corneille Revisited (1998) and Women Reading Corneille (2000), and the editor, among other volumes, of Le Mariage Sous L'Ancien Régime. Her work on early modern marriage led to her interest in the history of medicine and the idea of contagion.