Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
Film as Philosophy
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
Film as Philosophy
Essays on Cinema after Wittgenstein and Cavell
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
27 Sep 2005
|
£71.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781403949004
||
 
 
27 Sep 2005
|
£24.99
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9781403997951
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Why should philosophers be interested in cinema? Or film studies in philosophy? In this lively and thought-provoking book, philosophers and film experts come together to write about a wide range of films: classic Hollywood comedies, war films, Eastern European art films, crime, science fiction, etc. What unites them is a belief that watching film can not only illuminate philosophy, provide examples, illustrate philosophical problems, and so on, but can in an important sense be doing philosophy as well. In turn thinking philosophically can bring to light new aspects of film. The book is crowned with an interview with Wittgensteinian philosopher Stanley Cavell, who discusses his interests in philosophy, how he came to be fascinated by the cinema, and how through his work and publications these two areas have been brought together.


Description

Why should philosophers be interested in cinema? Or film studies in philosophy? In this lively and thought-provoking book, philosophers and film experts come together to write about a wide range of films: classic Hollywood comedies, war films, Eastern European art films, crime, science fiction, etc. What unites them is a belief that watching film can not only illuminate philosophy, provide examples, illustrate philosophical problems, and so on, but can in an important sense be doing philosophy as well. In turn thinking philosophically can bring to light new aspects of film. The book is crowned with an interview with Wittgensteinian philosopher Stanley Cavell, who discusses his interests in philosophy, how he came to be fascinated by the cinema, and how through his work and publications these two areas have been brought together.


Reviews

'A collection of articles on individual films both interesting in itself, and fascinating as a sign of the fruitful and widespread impact on thinking about movies that Stanley Cavell's work is beginning to have. To top it off, there is a conversation with Cavell (conducted by Andrew Klevan) that is, by itself, worth the price of admission.' - Professor Stanley Bates, Department of Philosophy, Middlebury College, USA

'...a fine collection of writings by a new generation of philosophers interested in looking anew at film as philosophical practice. Rather than merely using cinema to illustrate classic philosophical positions, each endeavours to see film as a potential source of philosophical insight. In this respect it represents a wholly new view of the relationship between image and thought.' - Dr John Mullarkey, Department of Philosophy, University of Dundee, UK

'Building on the work of Wittgenstein and Cavell, this anthology draws our attention to ways in which film can be understood as philosophical texts and movie-goers can engage in philosophical investigation. In an assessable format, each author expertly guides us through issues related to memory, identity, reality and appearance, myth, the nature of self, free moral choice, Otherness, and conditions for personhood. In these pages are puzzle-games, jokes and riddles, feminist nightmares, and food for thought surrounding male violence, cannibalism, and myriad narratives about voice, voicelessness, dislocated voices, and the concept of order. We are drawn into discussions about camera angles, color, light and dark, voiceovers, pacing, and music.
The topics raised in these pages are so compelling they call for course development. Philosophical ideas are extended as they are placed in context of the relatively new medium of film. As we learn from these authors, by learning to 'read' films, the potential exists to expand the focus of philosophical engagement from university classrooms to the more public space of the movie theatre. As David Ruben claims, films 'tempt us toward philosophical insight'. Film as philosophy is an idea, and a book, that can be easily embraced.' - Professor Kristin Congdon, Department of Art and Department of Philosophy, University of Central Florida, USA


Contents

List of Plates
Preface
Notes on Contributors
Introduction I: A Philosopher Goes to the Cinema; J.Goodenough
Introduction II: What Theory of Film do Wittgenstein and Cavell have?; R.Read
PART I: ESSAYS
Cogito Ergo Film: Plato, Descartes and Fight Club; N.Bauer
In Space No-one can Hear you Scream; S.Mulhall
Memento: A Philosophical Investigation; P.Hutchinson & R.Read
The Everydayness of Don Giovanni; S.Glendinning
Silent Dialogue: Philosophizing with Jan Svankmajer; D.Rudrum
Calm: On Terence Malik's The Thin Red Line; S.Critchley
Habitual Remarriage: The Ends of Happiness in The Palm Beach Story; S.Klawans
PART II: INTERVIEW
What Becomes of Thinking on Film?: Stanley Cavell in Conversation with Andrew Klevan
Bibliography
Index


Authors

RUPERT READ is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of East Anglia, is the author of Kuhn (with Wes Sharrock) and editor of The New Wittgenstein (with Alice Crary. Current interests include issues in philosophy of maths, Wittgenstein and Zen Buddhism, and a manuscript on psychosis in film and philosophy

JERRY GOODENOUGH is Tutor in Philosophy at the University of East Anglia, UK and the author of a number of papers on personal identity. His work in this area and his long-time interest in science-fiction and film are starting to come together in a project about questions of identity in film.