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Job Quality and Employer Behaviour
 
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Job Quality and Employer Behaviour
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
05 Aug 2005
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£90.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781403947949
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

This book takes a fresh look at the issue of job quality, analysing employer behaviour and discussing the agenda for policy intervention. The contributions in the volume provide new perspectives on a highly debated and policy relevant issue.
Between 1997 and 2002, more than twelve million new jobs were created in the European Union and labour market participation increased by more than eight million. Whilst a good deal of these new jobs have been created in high-tech and/or knowledge-intensive sectors providing workers with decent pay, job security, training and career development prospects, a significant share of jobs, particularly in labour-intensive service sector industries fail to do so. Increased concern over the quality of jobs has been fostered also by a number of stylised facts such as increasing earnings inequality, greater job flexibility, labour market de-regulation and the de-centralisation of collective bargaining, coupled with lower unionisation and greater competitive pressure. These developments have contributed to a generalised perception of a deterioration of the overall quality of the jobs exposing workers at disproportionate risk of unemployment and social exclusion. Whilst supply side explanations have traditionally been used to explain why some individuals are on the margins of the labour market or are socially excluded, the role of the demand side has been neglected. In particular, what are the charactersitics of firms and employers operating in the 'low wage-low quality' labour market? Why do low quality jobs tend to be disproportionately concentrated in labour-intensive service sector industries? Which features should be the focus of firm level policies directed at improving the 'quality' of work for the low paid and low skilled workers.


Description

This book takes a fresh look at the issue of job quality, analysing employer behaviour and discussing the agenda for policy intervention. The contributions in the volume provide new perspectives on a highly debated and policy relevant issue.
Between 1997 and 2002, more than twelve million new jobs were created in the European Union and labour market participation increased by more than eight million. Whilst a good deal of these new jobs have been created in high-tech and/or knowledge-intensive sectors providing workers with decent pay, job security, training and career development prospects, a significant share of jobs, particularly in labour-intensive service sector industries fail to do so. Increased concern over the quality of jobs has been fostered also by a number of stylised facts such as increasing earnings inequality, greater job flexibility, labour market de-regulation and the de-centralisation of collective bargaining, coupled with lower unionisation and greater competitive pressure. These developments have contributed to a generalised perception of a deterioration of the overall quality of the jobs exposing workers at disproportionate risk of unemployment and social exclusion. Whilst supply side explanations have traditionally been used to explain why some individuals are on the margins of the labour market or are socially excluded, the role of the demand side has been neglected. In particular, what are the charactersitics of firms and employers operating in the 'low wage-low quality' labour market? Why do low quality jobs tend to be disproportionately concentrated in labour-intensive service sector industries? Which features should be the focus of firm level policies directed at improving the 'quality' of work for the low paid and low skilled workers.


Contents

Introduction; S.Bazen; C.Lucifora & W.Salverda
PART 1: JOB QUALITY AND JOB SATISFACTION
What Makes a Good Job? Evidence from OECD Countries; A.Clark
Job Quality in European Labour Markets; F.Siebern-Thomas
Job Satisfaction and Consumer Behaviour; A.Bryson, L.Cappellari & C.Lucifora
PART 2: THE ROLE OF EMPLOYERS
Employers in the Low-Wage Labour Market: Is Their Role Important? H.J.Holzer
Using Qualitative Data to Understand Employment Behaviour in Low-Wage Labour Markets; D.Grimshaw
Within and Between Firm Mobility in the Low-Wage Labour Market; I.Bolvig
PART 3: JOB QUALITY IN THE SERVICE SECTOR
Job Stability, Earnings Mobility in the Low-Skill Service Sector in France; S.Bazen
Employment Systems in Labour-Intensive Activities: The Case of Retailing in France; F.Jany-Catrice, N.Gadrey & M.Pernod
Gender Wages and Careers in Retail Trade and IT Services: The Case of Finland; R.Asplund & R.Lilja
Heterogeneous Returns to Training in Personal Services; T.Zwick & A.Kuckulenz
PART 4: POLICY ISSUES
Making Bad Jobs Good: Strategies for the Service Sector; P.Osterman
Changing Lifetime Earnings Profiles by Social Class; A.McKnight


Authors

STEPHEN BAZEN is Professor of Economics at the Université de Savoie, France. Prior to this he was a Lecturer in Economics at the University of Kent at Canterbury and Lecturer then Professor of Economics at Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV, France. He has published articles on the impact of minimum wages and employment and wage determination in academic journals. He has also written, co-edited and contributed to a large number of books on labour market issues, including Labour Market Inequalities: Problems and Policies of Low-wage Employment in International Perspective co-edited with M. Gregory and W. Salverda.

CLAUDIO LUCIFORA is Professor of Economics at the Università Cattolica di Milano, where he also teaches Labour Economics. He has held teaching and research positions at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Universitat Autonoma, Université de Paris 2, Australian National University and Warwick University. He is Research Fellow of IZA, CHILD and ERMES. He has widely published in international journals on various economic issues such as wage determination, economics of trade unions and economics of education. He has recently edited with D. Checchi Education, Training and Labour Market Outcomes in Europe. He is a member of the executive committee and treasurer of the European Association of Labour Economists (EALE).

WIEMER SALVERDA is Director of the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies and Coordinator of the European Low-wage Employment Research Network (LoWER) which, with funding of the European Commission, has since 1996 promoted the study of low-paid and low-skilled labour markets. This has been a broad framework, ranging from the earnings mobility of and the training of individuals, via demand for consumer services to employer behaviour. Together with Ronald Schettkat, he recently coordinated research on Demand Patterns and Employment Growth in Europe and the US. He contributed nationally and internationally on youth employment, the 'Dutch miracle', international comparisons of unemployment rates and income inequality.