Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
London Politics, 1760-1914
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
London Politics, 1760-1914
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
29 Nov 2005
|
£89.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403990006
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

This collection offers the first detailed investigation of politics in nineteenth-century London. Charting the capital's course from a stronghold of radicalism in 1800 to a fortress of Conservatism a century later, it reclaims London's place at the heart of the nation's political life.
The contributors argue that for all the prominence of provincial agitations for free trade and religious liberty, London continued to define the political nation.
All provincial movements sought to conquer the capital, yet London remained a tough nut to crack. It had its own political priorities. The contributors explore its unique political microclimate, its traditions of electoral independence and political policing, its Whiggery and its Radicalism, the Conservatism of its poor and their enthusiasm for Empire.
By establishing the tension between provincial and metropolitan political agendas, this volume thus offers a major challenge to existing interpretations of nineteenth-century British history.


Description

This collection offers the first detailed investigation of politics in nineteenth-century London. Charting the capital's course from a stronghold of radicalism in 1800 to a fortress of Conservatism a century later, it reclaims London's place at the heart of the nation's political life.
The contributors argue that for all the prominence of provincial agitations for free trade and religious liberty, London continued to define the political nation.
All provincial movements sought to conquer the capital, yet London remained a tough nut to crack. It had its own political priorities. The contributors explore its unique political microclimate, its traditions of electoral independence and political policing, its Whiggery and its Radicalism, the Conservatism of its poor and their enthusiasm for Empire.
By establishing the tension between provincial and metropolitan political agendas, this volume thus offers a major challenge to existing interpretations of nineteenth-century British history.


Reviews


'One of the book's attractions is its wide range of political concerns.' - Jerry White, Urban History
 
'...the editors are to be congratulated for putting together a coherent set of essays that make a substantial contribution to the historiography of both popular politics and London. This volume deserves to be widely read, and not just by political historians. Social and cultural historians will find much in this collection that reinforces the image of London as a national and imperial metropolis; as a place of conflict over space, class and religion; and as an arena for anxieties surrounding gender and poverty. Political historians will find rich pickings, especially for the way in which several of the essays problemise popular radicalism, revealing it to be a heterogeneous, even incoherent, political movement.' - Matthew Roberts, Parliamentary History


Contents

List of Tables
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Notes on Contributors
Introduction; M.Cragoe & A.Taylor
Metropolitan 'Radicalism' and Electoral Independence, 1760-1820; M.McCormack
'Policing the Peelers': Parliament, the Public and the Metropolitan Police, 1829-33; D.Campion
Metropolitan Whiggery, 1832-55; B.Weinstein
Post-Chartism: Metropolitan Perspectives on the Chartist Movement in Decline, 1848-80; A.Taylor
Secularism in the City: Geographies of Dissidence and the Importance of Radical Culture in the Metropolis; D.Nash
Transcending the Metropolis: London and Provincial Popular Radicalism, 1860-75; D.Mares
From 'First Constituency of the Empire' to 'Citadel of Reaction': Westminster, 1800-90; M.Baer
Late Victorian and Edwardian 'Slum Conservatism': How Different were the Politics of the London Poor?; M.Brodie
'In Darkest Lambeth': Henry Morton Stanley and the Imperial Politics of London Unionism; A.Windscheffel
London-over-the-border: Politics in Suburban Walthamstow, 1870-1914; T.Cooper
Conclusion; M.Cragoe & A.Taylor


Authors

MATTHEW CRAGOE is Professor of Modern British History at the University of Hertfordshire, UK. He has published widely on the history of nineteenth-century politics, including, most recently, Culture, Politics and National Identity in Wales, 1832-1886 (Oxford University Press, 2004).

ANTONY TAYLOR is Senior Lecturer in History at Sheffield Hallam University, UK. He has written and published widely on the history of mid-Victorian radicalism. His latest book, Lords of Misrule: Hostility to Aristocracy in Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Britain was published in 2004 by Palgrave Macmillan.