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Gender and Development
 
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Gender and Development
The Japanese Experience in Comparative Perspective
Edited by Mayumi Murayama
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
06 Oct 2005
|
£86.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403949448
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Although much has been written about Japanese economic development, less attention is given to its social development, and still less to gender related issues. The book analyses various aspects of Japanese historical and current experiences. It covers themes such as economic development and gender disparities, population policy, rural livelihood programs, rural income generation work and female empowerment, female political participation, sharing of domestic work, discourses on the modern family, state and gender, and women in factories. Each chapter is written not to analyze the Japanese case per se but in a comparative perspective with developing countries. The common message is a call for the creation of an interactive space to exchange individual experiences and insights between different societies in order to formulate a more powerful gender and development agenda in each society.


Description

Although much has been written about Japanese economic development, less attention is given to its social development, and still less to gender related issues. The book analyses various aspects of Japanese historical and current experiences. It covers themes such as economic development and gender disparities, population policy, rural livelihood programs, rural income generation work and female empowerment, female political participation, sharing of domestic work, discourses on the modern family, state and gender, and women in factories. Each chapter is written not to analyze the Japanese case per se but in a comparative perspective with developing countries. The common message is a call for the creation of an interactive space to exchange individual experiences and insights between different societies in order to formulate a more powerful gender and development agenda in each society.


Reviews

'Each chapter is written in a comparative perspective with developing countries. The common message is a call for the creation of an interactive space to exchange individual experiences and insights between different societies in order to formulate a more powerful gender and development agenda in each society'. - Oxfam Development Resource Review


Contents

Introduction: An Attempt to Integrate Gender and Development Issues of Japan and Developing Countries; M.Murayama
PART 1: REVIEWING JAPANESE EXPERIENCES
Economic Development and Gender Disparities: The Japanese Experience; H.Nogami
Gender Perspective in Family Planning: Development of Family Planning in Postwar Japan and Policy Implications from the Japanese Experience; Y.Hayase
'Livelihood Improvement' in Postwar Japan: Its Relevance for Rural Development Today; H.K.Sato
Entrepreneurship and Rural Women's Empowerment: Some Japanese and Thai Cases; K.Kano
PART 2: COMPARING JAPAN AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
Women's Participation in Politics and Women's Movement: The History and Background of Recent Successes of Women Candidates in Local Elections; K.Funabashi
Has Socialism Contributed to Gender Role Changes? A Comparison of Gender Roles in Cuba and Japan; K.Yamoaka
Nation-State, Family and Gender: Recent Studies in Japan and Turkey; K.Murakami
PART 3: INTEGRATING JAPAN AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES IN THE GLOBAL CONTEXT
Factory Women under Globalization: Incorporating Japanese Women into the Global Factory Debate; M.Murayama


Authors

MAYUMI MURAYAMA is Director of South Asian Studies Group, Area Studies Center at the Institute of Developing Economies (IDE-JETRO). She has written extensively on development issues concerning Bangladesh, where she spent six years in various capacities including as a student at Dhaka University and a research expert at the Japanese Embassy in Dhaka. Her recent interest in female factory workers has expanded to cover other countries including Japan. She is currently concerned about the issues of informalization of employment in both South Asia and Japan, and is interested in finding common ground for women in the different countries to work together to resist the trend.