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Transnational Nation
 
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Transnational Nation
United States History in Global Perspective since 1789
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
21 Jun 2007
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£67.50
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403993670
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21 Jun 2007
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£23.99
|Paperback In Stock
  
9781403993687
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

US history is increasingly being studied in a global context, and no study of world history or transnational history can fail to take into account the impact of the US. This essential volume challenges the tendency to see the US as a product of mainly internal political and economic forces which stress American difference from the larger world. Covering the period from 1789 to the time of 9/11 and its aftermath, Ian Tyrrell argues that the shaping of the United States was part of wider economic, social, cultural and political processes, such as:
- political democracy
- reform movements
- economic development
- migration
- the rise of the nation state
- American cultural expansion abroad
- imperialism
- the dramatic impacts of war and revolutions.

Tyrrell explains that the US did not grow in isolation from the forces of globalization and other transnational pressures; rather, the nation has had an uneasy relationship with the rest of the world, in which key movements and institutions promoted globalizing processes while, at the same time, preserving and developing American distinctiveness.

Examining the contemporary legacy of these enduring tensions for post-war America, this stimulating study offers readers a fresh, comparative perspective on the relationship between events and movements in the US and wider world.


Description

US history is increasingly being studied in a global context, and no study of world history or transnational history can fail to take into account the impact of the US. This essential volume challenges the tendency to see the US as a product of mainly internal political and economic forces which stress American difference from the larger world. Covering the period from 1789 to the time of 9/11 and its aftermath, Ian Tyrrell argues that the shaping of the United States was part of wider economic, social, cultural and political processes, such as:
- political democracy
- reform movements
- economic development
- migration
- the rise of the nation state
- American cultural expansion abroad
- imperialism
- the dramatic impacts of war and revolutions.

Tyrrell explains that the US did not grow in isolation from the forces of globalization and other transnational pressures; rather, the nation has had an uneasy relationship with the rest of the world, in which key movements and institutions promoted globalizing processes while, at the same time, preserving and developing American distinctiveness.

Examining the contemporary legacy of these enduring tensions for post-war America, this stimulating study offers readers a fresh, comparative perspective on the relationship between events and movements in the US and wider world.


Reviews

"Transnational Nation will help world historians to understand better the vexed and conflicted historyof the US relationship to global engagement. And, while the specific American combination of global pull and national insularity may be unique, its broad outlines are not, as the histories of China, Japan,Russia, or England would show. Without intending to, Transnational Nation provides an attractive template for producing a globally-informed history of any modern great power." - Journal of Global History


Contents

Preface
Introduction
Born in the Struggles of Empires: The American Republic in War and Revolution, 1789-1815
Commerce Pervades the World: Economic Connections and Disconnections
The Beacon of Improvement: Political and Social Reform
People in Motion: Nineteenth-Century Migration Experiences
Unwilling Immigrants and Diaspora Dreams
Racial and Ethnic Frontiers
America's Civil War and Its World Historical Implications
How Culture Travelled: Going Abroad, c. 1865-1914
Building the Nation-state in the Progressive Era: The Transnational Context
The Empire That Did Not Know Its Name
The New World Order in the Era of Woodrow Wilson
Forces of Integration: War and the Coming of the American Century, 1925-1970
Insular Impulses: Limits on International Integration, 1925 to 1970
From the 1970s to New Globalization: American Transnational Power and its Limits, 1971-2001
"Nothing Will Ever Be the Same": 9/11 and the Return of History
Further Reading
Index


Authors

IAN TYRRELL is Professor of History at the University of New South Wales, Australia. His teaching and research interests include American history, environmental history, comparative women's history and historiography. His previous publications include Historians in Public: The Practice of American History, 1890-1970 (2005).