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Public Sector Reform in Developing Countries
 
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Public Sector Reform in Developing Countries
Capacity Challenges to Improve Services
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
17 Jan 2006
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£70.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403987716
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

In a critical examination of some of the most topical and challenging issues confronting the public sector in developing counties in an era of globalization, the contributors to this book examine the potential and limits of managerial, fiscal and decentralization reforms, and highlight cases where selective use of some of the new management reforms has delivered positive results. A common thread that runs through the book is the challenges of capacity to improve public services. Looking beyond the past and the present into the future, the book provides lessons from the experience of implementing public sector reforms in developing countries. The book will be a valuable resource for academics, researchers, and postgraduate students in the fields of public administration and management, development studies, governance and politics. Practitioners in these fields will also find the book useful in providing valuable lessons and conclusions.


Description

In a critical examination of some of the most topical and challenging issues confronting the public sector in developing counties in an era of globalization, the contributors to this book examine the potential and limits of managerial, fiscal and decentralization reforms, and highlight cases where selective use of some of the new management reforms has delivered positive results. A common thread that runs through the book is the challenges of capacity to improve public services. Looking beyond the past and the present into the future, the book provides lessons from the experience of implementing public sector reforms in developing countries. The book will be a valuable resource for academics, researchers, and postgraduate students in the fields of public administration and management, development studies, governance and politics. Practitioners in these fields will also find the book useful in providing valuable lessons and conclusions.


Contents

List of Tables, Boxes and Figures
Preface
Notes on the Contributors
Introduction; Y.Bangura & G.A.Larbi
PART I: MANAGERIAL REFORM
Applying the New Public Management in Developing Countries; G.A.Larbi
Elusive Public Sector Reform in East and Southern Africa; O.Therkildsen
Public Sector Management Reform in Latin America; A.Nickson
Capacity to Deliver? Management, Institutions and Public Services in Developing Countries; R.Batley & G.A.Larbi
PART II: FISCAL REFORM
Fiscal and Capacity Building Reform; Y.Bangura
Employment and Pay Reform in Developing and Transition Societies; W. McCourt
PART III: DECENTRALIZATION REFORM
Fiscal Decentralization in Developing Countries: Theory and Practice; P.Smoke
Decentralization Policies and Practices Under Adjustment and Democratization in Africa; B.Olowu
Public-Private Partnerships and Pro-Poor Development: The Experience of the Cordoba Water Concession in Argentina; A.Nickson
CONCLUSION
Public Sector Reform: What are the Lessons of Experience? G.A.Larbi & Y.Bangura
Index


Authors

YUSUF BANGURA is a Research Co-ordinator at the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development where he has co-ordinated projects on structural adjustment, public sector reform, ethnic inequalities and public sector governance, racism and public policy, technocratic policymaking, and democracy and social policy. He has published widely on these issues, including on the politics of international economic relations, and taught political science in universities in Nigeria and Canada.

GEORGE A. LARBI is a Senior Lecturer in Public Sector Management and Governance in the International Development Department of the School of Public Policy, University of Birmingham, UK. He has particular interest in new approaches to public management, service delivery, capacity building and institutional development, and anti-corruption reforms in developing countries. He has published widely on public sector reform issues.