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23 Oct 2007
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£83.00
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9781403988188
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The contributors to this book explore the significance of language in articulating and maintaining identity in the context of power relations at all levels in society. As globalization gains momentum, and new technologies emerge, concepts of power and information are reshaped and the role of language changes. Contributions examine the importance of English as an indicator of power and influence in global contexts. The authors also focus on the new transnational context for minority language activists within the EU. Such benefits have not been extended to speakers of immigrant languages as the principle of indigeneity continues to remain central to language policy. Different mother tongues divide migrant and indigenous populations but relations can be vastly improved with structures reinforcing intercultural communication. Language can also act as boundary between peoples of different faiths and ethnic backgrounds and the final contribution explores changing concepts in the wake of 9/11 and the subsequent 'war on terror'.


Description

The contributors to this book explore the significance of language in articulating and maintaining identity in the context of power relations at all levels in society. As globalization gains momentum, and new technologies emerge, concepts of power and information are reshaped and the role of language changes. Contributions examine the importance of English as an indicator of power and influence in global contexts. The authors also focus on the new transnational context for minority language activists within the EU. Such benefits have not been extended to speakers of immigrant languages as the principle of indigeneity continues to remain central to language policy. Different mother tongues divide migrant and indigenous populations but relations can be vastly improved with structures reinforcing intercultural communication. Language can also act as boundary between peoples of different faiths and ethnic backgrounds and the final contribution explores changing concepts in the wake of 9/11 and the subsequent 'war on terror'.


Reviews


'...this edited collection provides a wealth of information and insights on the nature of conflicts (and potential conflicts) connected to language choice in public life, education and religion.' - Language Policy
 
'The contributions to this very interesting book succeed admirably in presenting and analyzing a wide variety of issues.' - Discourse Analysis
 
'The contributions to this very interesting book suceeds admirably in presenting and analyzing a wide variety of issues - mostly concerning Europe - looking into powerful languages such as Englis, minority languages such as Irish, and immigrant languages such as Chinese and Arabic. Each chapter includes an overview of the literature and offers attested examples, but beyond the intrinsic interest of the single essays the reader does appreciate the strong interconnection between them. The book is surprisingly unified, each chapter seems to anticipate the following, this the discussion on the various case studies turns out to be enjoyably readable and not fragmentary.' - Paola Attolino, The Linguist, Sep. 2008


Contents

List of Tables
Series Editor's Preface
Acknowledgements
Notes on the Contributors
Language and Power: Accommodation and Resistance; M.Nic Craith
Globalisation and Transformation: Language Planning in New Contexts; D.Mac Giolla Chríost
Linguistic Human Rights in Education: International Cast Studies; J.Saville
English in Europe: Threat or Promise?; R.Phillipson
Minority Protection and Lesser-Used Language Promotion: The Convention on the Future of the European Union; M.Warasin
Broadcasting for Minorities: The Case of the Celtic Languages; P.McDermott
Language, Culture and Identity: The Chinese Community in Northern Ireland; M.Delargy
Intercultural Communication: Chinese Culture in UK Education; R.Fong
Faith, Identity, Language: Muslim Migrants in Scotland and Northern Ireland; G.Marranci
Language, Faith and Communication; J.Dunlop
9/11 and the War on Terrorism: The Clash of 'Words', 'Cultures' and 'Civilisations': Myth or Reality; J.Rehman
Index


Authors

MÁIRÉAD NIC CRAITH is Director of the Academy for Irish Cultural Heritages, University of Ulster, UK. She has previously been attached to the University of Liverpool and University Colleges, Dublin and Cork. She is author and editor of several books including Europe and the Politics of Language (2006), Culture and Identity Politics in Northern Ireland (2004) and Plural Identities, Singular Narratives (2003). She was joint winner of the 2004 Ruth Michaelis Jena-Ratcliff research prize for folklife. In 2006, she was awarded a Senior Distinguished Research Fellowship at the University of Ulster.