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The New Film History
 
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The New Film History
Sources, Methods, Approaches
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
25 Apr 2007
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£69.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230001695
||
 
 
25 Jun 2009
|
£23.99
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9780230594487
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The New Film History is an accessible and wide-ranging account of the methods, sources and approaches used by modern film historians. Written in an engaging and lively style, the book seeks to overcome the traditional divide between Film Studies and Film History and to offer an overview of the key areas of research, including reception studies, genre, authorship and the historical film. It also offers detailed case studies on topics such as national identity and the historical film, the place of the screenwriter in authorship studies, the relationship between gangster and 'gansta', and the use of the Internet in reception studies. With contributions from fifteen leading film historians, this is the first major overview of the field of film history to be published in twenty years.


Description

The New Film History is an accessible and wide-ranging account of the methods, sources and approaches used by modern film historians. Written in an engaging and lively style, the book seeks to overcome the traditional divide between Film Studies and Film History and to offer an overview of the key areas of research, including reception studies, genre, authorship and the historical film. It also offers detailed case studies on topics such as national identity and the historical film, the place of the screenwriter in authorship studies, the relationship between gangster and 'gansta', and the use of the Internet in reception studies. With contributions from fifteen leading film historians, this is the first major overview of the field of film history to be published in twenty years.


Reviews


'The New Film History is an accessible and wide-ranging account of the methods, sources and approaches used by modern film historians ... an excellent book that should open up some interesting and exciting empirical and investigative pathways for the future of film scholarship.' - Ben McCann, Screening the Past
 
'This edited collection is a very welcome entry into the field of film history and provides a showcase for a broad range of new, empirically grounded research which engages with the structures and processes that have shaped the medium of film ... the essays are scholarly and engagingly written, and genuinely extend the boundaries of the discipline' - Melanie Bell, Journal of British Cinema and Television
 
 


Contents

Notes on Contributors
INTRODUCTION: The New Film History; J.Chapman, M.Glancy & S.Harper
PART 1: HISTORY
Gone With the Wind (1939) and the Lost Cause: A Critical View; M.Stokes
History and Representation: The Case of 1970s British Cinema; S.Harper
Gallipoli (1981): 'A Poignant Search For National Identity'; M.Connelly
'This Ship is England': History, Politics and National Identity in Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003); J.Chapman
PART 2: AUTHORSHIP
Art In Context: British Film Design of the 1940s; L.Ede
The Author as Author: Restoring the Screenwriter to British Film History; A.Spicer
When 'Hanoi Jane' Conquered Hollywood: Jane Fonda's Films and Activism, 1977-81; P.Krämer
PART 3: GENRE
The Politics of the Swashbuckler; J.Richards
The Stalinist Musical; R.Taylor
Now Voyager (1942): Melodrama Then and Now; M.Shingler
From Gangster to Gangsta: The Hood Film's Criminal Allegiance with Hollywood; J.Munby
PART 4: RECEPTION
Blackmail (1929): Hitchcock and Film Nationalism; M.Glancy
British Cinema, American Reception: Black Narcissus (1947) and the Legion of Decency; S.Street
Studying Cross-Cultural Marketing and Reception: Ingmar Bergman's Persona (1966); I.Stigsdotter & T.Bergfelder
The Wicker Man (1973) Email Digest: A Case Study in Web Ethnography; J.Smith
Index


Authors

JAMES CHAPMAN is Professor of Film Studies at the University of Leicester, UK. His books include Licence To Thrill: A Cultural History of the James Bond Films (1999), Cinemas of the World: Film and Society from 1895 to the Present (2003) and Past and Present: National Identity and the British Historical Film (2005).

MARK GLANCY is Senior Lecturer in History at Queen Mary, University of London, UK, where he teaches courses in American and British film history. His publications include When Hollywood Loved Britain: The Hollywood 'British' Film, 1939-45 (1999) and The 39 Steps: A British Film Guide (2003). He is currently completing a book entitled Hollywood and the Americanization of Britain, from the 1920s to the present.

SUE HARPER is a Professor of Film History at the University of Portsmouth, UK. She is the author of Picturing the Past: The Rise and Fall of the British Costume Film (1994), Women in British Cinema: Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know (2000) and, with Vincent Porter, British Cinema of the 1950s: The Decline of Deference (2003). She is the leader of an AHRC research project on 1970s British cinema.