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Dual Citizenship in Global Perspective
 
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Dual Citizenship in Global Perspective
From Unitary to Multiple Citizenship
Edited by Thomas Faist and Peter Kivisto
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
18 Sep 2007
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£73.00
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9780230006546
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Citizenship and political loyalty to a state have traditionally been considered inseparable, but in recent years, sovereign states have increasingly tolerated dual and multiple citizenships. More than half of all states now tolerate some form of dual citizenship but in an age of increasing transnational insecurity, questions of loyalty to the nation-state have gained renewed prominence.

In this timely collection, leading scholars explore how the increasing tolerance of dual citizenship reveals the growing liberalization of citizenship law and the increasing securitization of citizenship alongside the erosion of popular sovereignty and the changing role of nationalism and nationhood. If dual citizenship is no longer seen as a self-evident absurdity nor the harbinger of postnational citizenship beyond the state then how should it be understood? Examining the expansion of individual rights on one hand and continued prerogatives of states over full membership in the political community on the other, contributors to this book question whether the liberalization of citizenship fundamentally changes the boundaries of the political and transforms the very core of the political sphere.


Description

Citizenship and political loyalty to a state have traditionally been considered inseparable, but in recent years, sovereign states have increasingly tolerated dual and multiple citizenships. More than half of all states now tolerate some form of dual citizenship but in an age of increasing transnational insecurity, questions of loyalty to the nation-state have gained renewed prominence.

In this timely collection, leading scholars explore how the increasing tolerance of dual citizenship reveals the growing liberalization of citizenship law and the increasing securitization of citizenship alongside the erosion of popular sovereignty and the changing role of nationalism and nationhood. If dual citizenship is no longer seen as a self-evident absurdity nor the harbinger of postnational citizenship beyond the state then how should it be understood? Examining the expansion of individual rights on one hand and continued prerogatives of states over full membership in the political community on the other, contributors to this book question whether the liberalization of citizenship fundamentally changes the boundaries of the political and transforms the very core of the political sphere.


Contents

Introduction: The Shifting Boundaries of the Political; T.Faist
PART ONE: STATES AND HUMAN SECURITY
Dual Citizenship and Security Norms in Historical Perspective; P.Triadafilopoulos
The Securitization of Dual Citizenship; A.Macklin
PART TWO: NATIONALISM AND NATIONHOOD
The Trade-off between Transnational Citizenship and Political Autonomy; R.Bauböck
The Politics of Dual Citizenship in Hungary; M.M.Kovács
Migration and Transnational Citizenship in Latin America: The Cases of Mexico and the Dominican Republic; J.Itzigsohn
Varying Views in Democracy, Rights and Duties, and Membership: The Politics of Dual Citizenship in European Immigration States; J.Gerdes & T.Faist
PART THREE: POSTNATIONAL AND TRANSNATIONAL CITIZENSHIP
Much Ado about Nothing? The Contours of Dual Citizenship in the United States and Canada; I.Bloemraad
Dual Citizenship: A Postnational View; P.Spiro
Dual Citizenship among Hong Kong-Canadians: Convenience or Commitment?; V.Preston, M.Siemiatycki & A.Kobayashi
PART FOUR: CITIZENSHIP AND DEMOCRACY BEYOND BORDERS
Dual Citizenship, European Identity and Community-Building in Europe; W.Skrobacki
Twilight of Sovereignty or the Emergence of Cosmopolitan Norms? Rethinking Citizenship in Volatile Times; S.Benhabib
Conclusion: The Boundaries of Citizenship in a Transitional Age; P.Kivisto


Authors

THOMAS FAIST is Professor and Chair of Transnational Relations and Development Studies in the Faculty of Sociology, Bielefeld University, Germany. His research explores transnational migration and social spaces, immigrant integration and social policy. His most recent books include Dual Citizenship in Europe: From Nationhood to Societal Integration (2007); The Europeanization of National Immigration Policies: Between Autonomy and the European Union (2007, with Andreas Ette); and Citizenship: Theory, Discourse and Transnational Prospects (2007, with Peter Kivisto).

PETER KIVISTO is the Richard Swanson Professor of Social Thought and Chair of Sociology at Augustana College, USA. His publications include Citizenship: Discourse, Theory, and Transnational Prospects (2007, with Thomas Faist); Intersecting Inequalities (2007, with Elizabeth Hartung); Incorporating Diversity: Rethinking Assimilation in a Multicultural Age (2005); and Multiculturalism in a Global Society (2002). Currently, he is the Editor of Sociological Quarterly.