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Migration, Accommodation and Language Change
 
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Migration, Accommodation and Language Change
Language at the Intersection of Regional and Ethnic Identity
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
07 Mar 2008
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£69.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230008861
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

In the early decades of the twentieth century, large numbers of African American and White Southerners migrated from the rural South to the urban Midwest as part of the most significant internal migration in US history. This is a linguistic study of the Southern migrant experience in Detroit, a city with a reputation of being the most racially polarized and residentially segregated urban area in America. Although African American and Appalachian White southern migrants and their descendants are two groups that are separated by ethnicity, they share a regional affiliation with the South as well as Southern cultural characteristics. This situation provides a unique opportunity to examine ways in which the interaction of ethnicity and regional affiliation give rise to systematic patterns of language variation and change and phonetic restructuring as a result of language contact. Linguistic effects of large-scale migration for these two Southern groups across three generations of speakers are described and compared to the surrounding dialect norms of Midwestern Whites, through acoustic analysis of portions of the vowel systems. The quantitative acoustic analysis is interpreted with reference to rich qualitative data obtained through the author's four years of ethnographic fieldwork.


Description

In the early decades of the twentieth century, large numbers of African American and White Southerners migrated from the rural South to the urban Midwest as part of the most significant internal migration in US history. This is a linguistic study of the Southern migrant experience in Detroit, a city with a reputation of being the most racially polarized and residentially segregated urban area in America. Although African American and Appalachian White southern migrants and their descendants are two groups that are separated by ethnicity, they share a regional affiliation with the South as well as Southern cultural characteristics. This situation provides a unique opportunity to examine ways in which the interaction of ethnicity and regional affiliation give rise to systematic patterns of language variation and change and phonetic restructuring as a result of language contact. Linguistic effects of large-scale migration for these two Southern groups across three generations of speakers are described and compared to the surrounding dialect norms of Midwestern Whites, through acoustic analysis of portions of the vowel systems. The quantitative acoustic analysis is interpreted with reference to rich qualitative data obtained through the author's four years of ethnographic fieldwork.


Contents

List of Tables
List of Figures
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Empirical and Theoretical Background
The Sociolinguistic and Demographic Context for the Study
The Pilot Study
Acoustic Analysis of /e/ and /ae/ for 5 Appalachian White Women, 5 African American Women, and 5 Northern White Women
Field Techniques and Acoustic Methods
The High and Lower-High Back Vowels
The Patterning of /ai/
The Local and Supra-local Contexts for the Patterns of Usage
Conclusions and Implications
References
Index


Authors

BRIDGET L. ANDERSON is Assistant Professor of Linguistics at Old Dominion University, Virginia, USA. Her research investigates the social and phonological meaning of fine-grained acoustic phonetic detail present in the everyday speech that people use to situate themselves in social worlds. It addresses the theoretical concern of the relationship between internal (i.e. phonological) tendencies, such as coarticulation, and external (i.e. social/ideological) constraints on language change. The overarching goal of her research is to model how the speech signal provides social/ideological as well as linguistic information and to determine the mechanisms by which acoustic cues carry different social/ideological information over time, space, socially meaningful groups, and for individuals.