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Communicating Rights
 
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Communicating Rights
The Language of Arrest and Detention
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
13 Nov 2007
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£76.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230013315
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

People explain things to each other every day using both writing and speech. Communicating Rights examines the creativity which underpins everyday explanation and its power to influence lives. The rights communication in question occurs in police custody, where explanations shape crucial decisions. Data examined illustrate that when speakers and writers transform texts for others through explanation they work hard to convey meaning. They try to simplify words and grammar and consider the other's perspective and communicative needs. However, although explaining rights seems to be concerned with simply relaying facts it does much more. This apparently tightly-regulated, goal-oriented talk is used by both police officers and detainees to reassure, persuade, distract, challenge, empathise, learn, influence confidence, present identity, prospect intentions, show affiliation, make suggestions and bring formality. The book shows that analysts, institutions, indeed anyone who explains to others, might usefully recognize that their explanations do more than simply convey facts.


Description

People explain things to each other every day using both writing and speech. Communicating Rights examines the creativity which underpins everyday explanation and its power to influence lives. The rights communication in question occurs in police custody, where explanations shape crucial decisions. Data examined illustrate that when speakers and writers transform texts for others through explanation they work hard to convey meaning. They try to simplify words and grammar and consider the other's perspective and communicative needs. However, although explaining rights seems to be concerned with simply relaying facts it does much more. This apparently tightly-regulated, goal-oriented talk is used by both police officers and detainees to reassure, persuade, distract, challenge, empathise, learn, influence confidence, present identity, prospect intentions, show affiliation, make suggestions and bring formality. The book shows that analysts, institutions, indeed anyone who explains to others, might usefully recognize that their explanations do more than simply convey facts.


Reviews



'…this book is an extraordinary tour de force. It is a classic piece of applied linguistics, in that it uses theory and methods from a range of fields to analyse and address a social issue. It makes compelling use of authentic interview data to reveal how and why communication does and does not happen. It steps well beyond conventional linguistic theories to address cautioning as a social process. It is compulsory reading for anyone who is interested in cautioning.' – John Gibbons, Journal of Sociolinguistics
 
'...this book is a laudable effort to study "documents-in-action". The originality of this book lies in the fact that it is not just a discussion of how to improve the comprehensibility of "difficult" texts, but also an investigation of how these texts function in the real world.' - Martha Komter, Information Design Journal
 
'Communicating Rights makes a significant contribution not only to the field of language and the law but also to the UK justice system. Author Frances Rock should be applauded for her balanced yet sharp analyses of written and spoken rights communication, supported by her extensive repertoire of sociolinguistic tools for discourse analysis...I would recommend this book to scholars and legal professionals as a classic in rights communication.' Ikuko Nakane, The International Journal of Speech, Language and the Law


Contents

List Of Figures
Acknowledgements
Terminology and Key to Transcription Conventions
PART 1: RIGHTS AND RESEARCH: ORIENTATION AND THEORY
Introduction
Beyond Language as Transmission
PART 2: WRITING RIGHTS
Introducing Written Rights Communication
Working with Syntax and Lexis in Writing
Working with Organization in Writing
Working with Context: Rights Texts in Custody
Off The Page: Detainees' Reading Practices
PART 3: SPEAKING RIGHTS
Introducing Spoken Rights Communication
Working with Lexis in Speech
Working with Organization in Speech
Checking Comprehension
Beyond Explanation: Using Cautioning
PART 4: RIGHTING RIGHTS?
Conclusion
Notes
References
Appendices
Index


Authors

FRANCES ROCK is a Lecturer in the Centre for Language and Communication Research at Cardiff University, UK. She has previously taught at the Universities of Roehampton and Birmingham.