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The Administration of Sickness
 
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The Administration of Sickness
Medicine and Ethics in Nineteenth-Century Algeria
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
24 Sep 2008
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£70.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230500433
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

This book asks how ethics can help us to understand the encounter between French colonists and Algerians in the Nineteenth century. It focuses on questions of medicine since the claimed goodness of the French 'civilising mission' depended on the idea that the health of the Algerian people would be improved under imperial rule. In looking at the manner in which such moral claims were constructed and the way in which they operated in practice, Gallois offers one of the first comparative histories of medicine and ethics. The book argues that while the French failure to 'medicalise' Algerian society is well understood, histories of health also need to consider ways in which policies of massacre and extermination were conceived as being morally good, and how the diminution of the Algerian population was countenanced at moments of famine and epidemic disease. It also offers the first accounts of Algerian doctors working in colonial medicine, looking at the manner in which they developed an ethics of resistance to empire.


Description

This book asks how ethics can help us to understand the encounter between French colonists and Algerians in the Nineteenth century. It focuses on questions of medicine since the claimed goodness of the French 'civilising mission' depended on the idea that the health of the Algerian people would be improved under imperial rule. In looking at the manner in which such moral claims were constructed and the way in which they operated in practice, Gallois offers one of the first comparative histories of medicine and ethics. The book argues that while the French failure to 'medicalise' Algerian society is well understood, histories of health also need to consider ways in which policies of massacre and extermination were conceived as being morally good, and how the diminution of the Algerian population was countenanced at moments of famine and epidemic disease. It also offers the first accounts of Algerian doctors working in colonial medicine, looking at the manner in which they developed an ethics of resistance to empire.


Reviews

'A welcome intervention in an emerging field...This is an engaged and sometimes provocative exploration of the moral and ideological structures of colonial medicine in Algeria. It invites us to examine medical practices and lived experiences so that we might see the tensions and fractures which lay at the heart of the idea of colonial medicine and a medicalized colonial society.' - Revue d'Histoire du XIXe Siecle


Contents

Introduction
On the Idea of Medical Imperialism
On Humanitarian Desire
On Extermination
On Attendance to Suffering and Demographic Collapse
On the Just and Sovereign Testimony of Abdel Kader ben Zahra
On Injustice and the Disavowal of Autonomy
Bibliography


Authors

WILLIAM GALLOIS is a Reader in History at Roehampton University, UK, having previously worked at SOAS, the American University of Sharjah and Queen Mary, University of London. He published Zola: The History of Capitalism in 1999 and Time, Religion and History in 2007.