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Uncanny Modernity
 
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Uncanny Modernity
Cultural Theories, Modern Anxieties
Edited by Jo Collins and John Jervis
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
01 Apr 2008
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£58.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230517714
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

The uncanny is an experience of disorientation, of something disturbing, so that our ordinary world seems suddenly strange, eerie. We ask – where does the uncanny come from? Why has it become a favourite figure for our simultaneous experience of the present as homeless and the past as haunting? And could it be that the uncanny is a peculiarly modern experience?
 
Challenging conventional disciplinary boundaries, this wide-ranging and illuminating collection of essays by scholars in literary, film and cultural studies pursues these issues through the modern city, the night, gender, trauma, modernism, early cinema, the ghost film, contemporary fiction, and terrorism. Opening up the debate beyond Freud, the essays suggest that the uncanny both testifies to a distinctive sensibility, calling for a cultural aesthetics of the modern experience, while inevitably subverting the serene confidence of any explanatory framework that seeks to capture it.


Description

The uncanny is an experience of disorientation, of something disturbing, so that our ordinary world seems suddenly strange, eerie. We ask – where does the uncanny come from? Why has it become a favourite figure for our simultaneous experience of the present as homeless and the past as haunting? And could it be that the uncanny is a peculiarly modern experience?
 
Challenging conventional disciplinary boundaries, this wide-ranging and illuminating collection of essays by scholars in literary, film and cultural studies pursues these issues through the modern city, the night, gender, trauma, modernism, early cinema, the ghost film, contemporary fiction, and terrorism. Opening up the debate beyond Freud, the essays suggest that the uncanny both testifies to a distinctive sensibility, calling for a cultural aesthetics of the modern experience, while inevitably subverting the serene confidence of any explanatory framework that seeks to capture it.


Contents

Notes on Contributors
Introduction; J.Collins& J.Jervis
Uncanny Presences; J.Jervis
Night and the Uncanny; E.Bronfen
Uncanny Reflections, Modern Illusions: Sighting the Modern Optical Uncanny; T.Gunning
As it Happened... Borderline, the Uncanny and the Cosmopolitan; J.Donald
Access Denied: Memory and Resistance in the Contemporary Ghost Film; S.Brewster
The Uncanny After Freud: The Contemporary Trauma Subject and the Fiction of Stephen King; R.Luckhurst
'Neurotic Men' and a Spectral Woman: Freud, Jung and Sabina Spielrein; J.Collins
The Urban Uncanny; J.Wolfreys
Profane Illuminations, Delicate and Mysterious Flames: Mass Culture and Uncanny Gnosis; M.Saler
'On the Psychology of the Uncanny': Ernest Jentsch; translated by R.Sellars
Terrorism and the Uncanny, or, The Caves of Tora-Bora; D.Punter
Index


Authors

JO COLLINS teaches in the Cultural Studies and English and American Literature departments at the University of Kent at Canterbury, UK. Her thesis examined the use of gothic tropes in colonial literature and travel writing, and she is currently reworking this for publication. She has also published articles on colonial Australian women writers.

JOHN JERVIS teaches Cultural Studies at the University of Kent at Canterbury, UK. He has previously published Exploring the Modern: Patterns of Western Culture and Civilisation (1998) and Transgressing the Modern: Explorations in the Western Experience of Otherness (2000). He is currently writing a book provisionally entitled Sensational Subjects: Modernity and the Spectacle of Feeling.