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Social Policy in Sub-Saharan African Context
 
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Social Policy in Sub-Saharan African Context
In Search of Inclusive Development
Edited by Jìmí Adésínà
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
12 Jul 2007
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£86.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230520837
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

This volume reviews Africa's past experiences of social policy, focusing on healthcare, education, the labour market and social welfare. What stands out from these studies is how well the post-colonial nationalist leaders understood the positive links between social policy, economic development, and nation building. The deficit of democratic governance is the more significant failing of the period. However, rather than fix the democratic deficit, these studies show that what structural adjustment programmes did was to undermine economic and social policy, while reducing governance to a set of instrumental objectives. Further, we need to transcend the idea of the state and civil society as antagonistic forces. Where this has happened, there has been successful extension of social protection and the widening of access to health and education. The lessons for rebuilding Africa are obvious: economic development and social policy are mutually inclusive, and active social policy promotes national cohesion.


Description

This volume reviews Africa's past experiences of social policy, focusing on healthcare, education, the labour market and social welfare. What stands out from these studies is how well the post-colonial nationalist leaders understood the positive links between social policy, economic development, and nation building. The deficit of democratic governance is the more significant failing of the period. However, rather than fix the democratic deficit, these studies show that what structural adjustment programmes did was to undermine economic and social policy, while reducing governance to a set of instrumental objectives. Further, we need to transcend the idea of the state and civil society as antagonistic forces. Where this has happened, there has been successful extension of social protection and the widening of access to health and education. The lessons for rebuilding Africa are obvious: economic development and social policy are mutually inclusive, and active social policy promotes national cohesion.


Reviews

'Reviews Africa's past experiences of social policy, with an eye on the future, and examines a range of policy issues around healthcare, education, the labour market and social welfare.' - International Social Security Review


Contents

List of Tables
List of Figures
Foreword
Preface
List of Abbreviations and Acronyms
Notes on Contributors
Social Policy and the Quest for Inclusive Development: Introduction; J.Adésínà
Ruling Ideas and Social Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Assessment of Nationalist, Keynesian and Neoliberal Paradigms; A.G.Garba
Social Policy and Development in East Africa: The Case of Education and Labour Market Policies; C.S.L.Chachage
Education, Employment and Development in Southern Africa: The Role of Social Policy in Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe; F.T.Hendricks
Social Policy and the Challenge of Development in Nigeria and Ghana: The Cases of Education and Labour Market Policies; B.Udegbe
The Role of Social Policy in Development: Health, Water and Sanitation in East Africa; R.Atieno & A.Ouma Shem
The Socio-Political Structure of Accumulation and Social Policy in Southern Africa; P.Bond
Social Policy in the Development Context: Water, Health and Sanitation in Ghana and Nigeria; O.Obono
Index


Authors

JÌMÍ ADÉSÍNÀ is Professor of Sociology at Rhodes University, South Africa. He received his education at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, and the University of Warwick, UK, where he obtained his PhD. His teaching and research interests include labour and development studies, social theory, methodology, and social policy.