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Cinema and Technology
 
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Cinema and Technology
Cultures, Theories, Practices
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
27 Nov 2008
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£61.00
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9780230524774
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Within Film Studies and Media Studies, interest in technology has grown in recent years in response to rapid developments in digital and computer media. Cinema's relationship with the technological, however, remains contested. Many contemporary writers describe these technological shifts as alarmingly disruptive, threatening either to destroy or disfigure cinema. This collection of essays does something different. It seeks to situate changes in, for instance, film stock, animation, the depiction of robots and the development of 'synthespians', fire regulations in cinemas, or neurological accounts of spectatorship within more broadly defined technocultural processes around cinema. In order to understand the relationship between cinema and technology, the book draws on media and cultural studies, media anthropology, science and technology studies, philosophy and film theory. Analysing examples that range from cutting-edge Hollywood blockbusters to internet viral films, and from Victorian cinema to the present, this volume brings technology into debates around cinema's forms, meanings and audiences.


Description

Within Film Studies and Media Studies, interest in technology has grown in recent years in response to rapid developments in digital and computer media. Cinema's relationship with the technological, however, remains contested. Many contemporary writers describe these technological shifts as alarmingly disruptive, threatening either to destroy or disfigure cinema. This collection of essays does something different. It seeks to situate changes in, for instance, film stock, animation, the depiction of robots and the development of 'synthespians', fire regulations in cinemas, or neurological accounts of spectatorship within more broadly defined technocultural processes around cinema. In order to understand the relationship between cinema and technology, the book draws on media and cultural studies, media anthropology, science and technology studies, philosophy and film theory. Analysing examples that range from cutting-edge Hollywood blockbusters to internet viral films, and from Victorian cinema to the present, this volume brings technology into debates around cinema's forms, meanings and audiences.


Contents

Biographical Notes
Acknowledgements
Introduction: B.Bennett, M.Furstenau& A.Mackenzie
PART 1: FORMAT
The Perilous Gauge: Canadian Independent Film Exhibition and the 16mm Mobile Menace; P.Lester
BMW Films and the Star Wars Kid: 'Early Web Cinema' and Technology; A.Clay
On Some Limits to Film Theory (Mainly From Science); J.Elkins
PART 2: NORMS
Socially Combustible: Panicky People, Flammable Films, and the Dangerous New Technology of the Nickelodeon; P.Moore
Cinema and its Doubles: Kittler vs. Deleuze; J.Harris
Genomic Science in Contemporary Film: Institutions, Individuals and Genre; K.O'Riordan
PART 3: SCANNING
Cinema as Technology: Encounters with an Interface; A.Wood
Demonlover: Interval, Affect and the Aesthetics of Digital Dislocation; M.Manojlovic
'Into the décor': Attention and Distraction, Foreground and Background; C.Rodrigues
Children, Robots, Cinephilia and Technophobia; B.Bennett
PART 4: MOVEMENT
Lola and the Vampire: Technologies of Time and Movement in German Cinema; M.Langford
Inbetweening: Animation, Deleuze, Film Theory; B.Schaffer
Affective Troubles and Cinema; M-L.Angerer
Afterword: Digital Cinema and the Apparatus: Archaeologies, Epistemologies, Ontologies; T.Elsaesser
Bibliography
Index


Authors

BRUCE BENNETT is Lecturer in Film Studies, Institute for Cultural Research, Lancaster University, UK. He researches in the areas of film theory and has published several articles.

MARC FURSTENAU is Lecturer in Film Studies at Carleton University, Canada. He researches in the areas of film and media history and theory.

ADRIAN MACKENZIE is Lecturer in Film Studies, Institute for Cultural Research, Lancaster University, UK. His publications include Transductions: Bodies and Machines at Speed, Technologies, Studies in Culture and Theory, and Cutting Code: Software and Sociality.