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The History of British Women
 
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The History of British Women's Writing, 1750-1830
Volume Five
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
20 Aug 2010
|
£61.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230550711
||
 
 
19 Sep 2013
|
£18.99
|Paperback In Stock
  
9781137350398
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect  ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors


This period witnessed the first full flowering of women's writing in Britain. Building on the success and popularity of earlier poets, novelists, playwrights, and philosophers, British women consolidated their significance as writers in the second half of the long eighteenth century. They participated in movements like Bluestocking intellectualism, abolition, new understandings of class, religion, and childhood. They initiated literary styles like the novel of sensibility, the elegiac sonnet, and the historical romance. Their writing both signalled transitions (from the Enlightenment to Romanticism, from Romanticism to early Victorianism) and transcended conventional literary periodization. The last 25 years of scholarship and textual recovery have overturned the assumption that women wrote unambitiously and mostly anonymously, concentrating on 'feminine' concerns like the family and the home. Instead, an understanding of the period which sees Mary Wollstonecraft, Dorothy Wordsworth, and Jane Austen as only the more familiar of a host of writers has become standard.


Description


This period witnessed the first full flowering of women's writing in Britain. Building on the success and popularity of earlier poets, novelists, playwrights, and philosophers, British women consolidated their significance as writers in the second half of the long eighteenth century. They participated in movements like Bluestocking intellectualism, abolition, new understandings of class, religion, and childhood. They initiated literary styles like the novel of sensibility, the elegiac sonnet, and the historical romance. Their writing both signalled transitions (from the Enlightenment to Romanticism, from Romanticism to early Victorianism) and transcended conventional literary periodization. The last 25 years of scholarship and textual recovery have overturned the assumption that women wrote unambitiously and mostly anonymously, concentrating on 'feminine' concerns like the family and the home. Instead, an understanding of the period which sees Mary Wollstonecraft, Dorothy Wordsworth, and Jane Austen as only the more familiar of a host of writers has become standard.


Reviews

'...this volume is essential reading for scholars working in the field, and a superb introduction for those new to it.' - Benjamin Dabby, Victoriographies


Contents

List of Figures
Author Preface
Series Preface
Acknowledgements
Notes on Contributors
Chronology
Introduction: Defining 'Women's Writing'; or, Writing 'The History'; J.M.Labbe
PART I: 1750-1830: OVERVIEWS
Women and Print Culture, 1750-1830; M.Levy
Women's Travel Writing, 1750-1830; K.Turner
PART II: 1750-1800: REVOLUTIONS IN FEMALE WRITING
Bluestocking Women and the Negotiations of Oral, Manuscript and Print Cultures; B.A.Schellenberg
'[T]o strike a little out of a road already so much beaten': Gender, Genre and the Mid-Century Novel; J.Batchelor
Anglophone Welsh Women's Poetry 1750-1784: Jane Cave and Anne Penny; S.Prescott
The Poem That Ate America: Helen Maria Williams' Ode on the Peace (1783); K.Davies
Picturing Benevolence Against the Commercial Cry, 1750-1798: or, Sarah Fielding and the Secret Causes of Romanticism; D.Landry
Women Writers and Abolition; D.Coleman
Charlotte Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft, and the Romance of Real Life; S.Curran
Charlotte Smith, Mary Robinson, and the First Year of War with France; H.Guest
PART III: 1800-1830: WORLDS OF WRITING
The Porter Sisters, Women's Writing, and Historical Fiction; D.Looser 
Joanna Baillie's Emblematic Theatre; B.Bolton
National Internationalism: Women's Writings and European Literature, 1800-1830; D.Saglia
Jane Austen's Critical Response to Women's Writing: 'a good spot for fault-finding'; O.Murphy
Mary Tighe and the Coterie of British Women Poets in Psyche; H.K.Linkin
Influence, Anxiety, and Erasure in Women's Writing: Romantic Becomes Victorian; S.C. Behrendt
Bibliography
Index


Authors

JACQUELINE M. LABBE teaches and researches in the area of British Romantic poetry and poetics at the University of Warwick, UK. She has published widely on Charlotte Smith, the poetry and novels of the Romantic period, and nineteenth-century children's literature.