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Globalization and the Poor in Asia
 
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Globalization and the Poor in Asia
Can Shared Growth be Sustained?
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
17 Apr 2008
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£86.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230201880
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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Asia is widely regarded as the region which has benefited most from the dynamic growth effect of the recent wave of globalization: poverty has been steadily declining over the last three decades in most Asian countries. The 'shared growth' model achieved through increased trade and foreign direct investment in East Asia in the 1960–80s is seen as highly inclusive, yet, more recently, there is growing evidence that inequality has been rising through the integration process in many parts of Asia. Detailed examinations of the mechanisms at work in the globalization–poverty nexus in Asia at this time are thus both instructive and relevant to policymakers and development specialists.
This book presents nine case studies, reflecting different settings of the impact of globalization on the poor and providing valuable lessons on how Asia could move towards a more pro-poor development path.


Description

Asia is widely regarded as the region which has benefited most from the dynamic growth effect of the recent wave of globalization: poverty has been steadily declining over the last three decades in most Asian countries. The 'shared growth' model achieved through increased trade and foreign direct investment in East Asia in the 1960–80s is seen as highly inclusive, yet, more recently, there is growing evidence that inequality has been rising through the integration process in many parts of Asia. Detailed examinations of the mechanisms at work in the globalization–poverty nexus in Asia at this time are thus both instructive and relevant to policymakers and development specialists.
This book presents nine case studies, reflecting different settings of the impact of globalization on the poor and providing valuable lessons on how Asia could move towards a more pro-poor development path.


Contents

Globalization and Poverty in Asia; M.NissankeE.Thorbecke
Pro-Poor Growth: The Asian Experience; N.KakwaniH.H.Son
How Does Vietnam's Accession to the World Trade Organization Change the Spatial Incidence of Poverty; T.FujiiD.Roland-Holst
Trade, Migration, and Poverty Reduction in the Globalizing Economy: The Case of the Philippines; Y.SawadaJ.P.Estudillo
Threshold Estimation on the Globalization-Poverty Nexus: Evidence from China; Z.Liang
Economic Development Strategy, Openness and Rural Poverty: A Framework and China's Experiences; J.Y.LinP.Lin
Vulnerability to Globalization in India: Relative Rankings of States using Fuzzy Models; K.S.K.KumarB.Viswanathan
Resource-Poor Farmers in South India: On the Margins or Frontiers of Globalization; R.M.Aggarwal
Credit Constraints as a Barrier to Technology Adoption by the Poor: Lessons from South Indian Small Scale Fishery; X.GinéS.Klonner
Trade Liberalization, Environment and Poverty: A Developing Country Perspective; M.S.Qureshi


Authors

MACHIKO NISSANKE is Professor of Economics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, UK. She previously worked at Birkbeck College, University College London and the University of Oxford, and was also Research Fellow of Nuffield College and the Overseas Development Institute. She has published numerous books and journal articles in financial and international economics, and has served many international organizations as advisor and co-ordinator of research programmes.

ERIK THORBECKE is the H.E. Babcock Professor of Economics Emeritus, Graduate School Professor and former Director of the Program on Comparative Economic Development at Cornell University, USA. He has published extensively in the areas of economic and agricultural development, the measurement and analysis of poverty and malnutrition, the Social Accounting Matrix and general equilibrium modelling, and international economics. The Foster-Greer-Thorbecke poverty measure has been adopted almost universally by international organizations and researchers doing empirical work on poverty.