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Industrial Design, Competition and Globalization
 
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Industrial Design, Competition and Globalization
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
19 Nov 2009
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£66.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230203495
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect  ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Economic activities continue to become increasingly globalized. One result being that for companies located in developed market economies price-based competition is being replaced or supplemented by other forms of competitiveness. This book explores the shift towards design-based competitiveness and the escalation in the design-intensity of goods and services. The emphasis is on understanding the relationship between industrial design and product, corporate or national competitiveness. Industrial design's contribution to corporate competitiveness includes enhanced sales, greater profit margins compared to competitor products, improvements in manufacturing efficiency, speed of repair and enhanced visibility for the firm and its products. Design has become an important element in national and regional economic policies as governments acknowledge the important relationship that exists between design and the creation of high-value added products. Given the role design plays in corporate competitiveness, it is timely to bring together a group of academics to explore the importance of industrial design within the contemporary economy.


Description

Economic activities continue to become increasingly globalized. One result being that for companies located in developed market economies price-based competition is being replaced or supplemented by other forms of competitiveness. This book explores the shift towards design-based competitiveness and the escalation in the design-intensity of goods and services. The emphasis is on understanding the relationship between industrial design and product, corporate or national competitiveness. Industrial design's contribution to corporate competitiveness includes enhanced sales, greater profit margins compared to competitor products, improvements in manufacturing efficiency, speed of repair and enhanced visibility for the firm and its products. Design has become an important element in national and regional economic policies as governments acknowledge the important relationship that exists between design and the creation of high-value added products. Given the role design plays in corporate competitiveness, it is timely to bring together a group of academics to explore the importance of industrial design within the contemporary economy.


Contents

Industrial Design, Competition and Globalization; G.Rusten & J.R.Bryson
PART I: INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AND NATIONAL COMPETITIVENESS
Industrial Design, National and Regional Policy and National Competitiveness; J.R.Bryson
The Finnish Design Cluster in the Age of Austerity; N.Solitander
Locational Patterns and Competitive Characteristics of Industrial Design Firms in the United States; A.D.MacPherson & V.Vanchan
The Geography of Producing and Marketing Design for Montreal Fashion: Exploring the role of Cultural Intermediaries; N.Rantisi
Designed Here, Made There? Project-based Design Work in Toronto, Canada; T.Vinodrai
The Geography of Design in the City; T.A.Hutton
PART II: DESIGN AND FIRM COMPETITIVENESS
Design, Gender and Competitiveness; L.Hansson, M.Jahnke, M.Mörck & M.Petersson
Riding the Waves of Design: Industrial Design and Competitive Products in the Norwegian Marine, Maritime and Offshore Sectors; G.Rusten
Is Good Design Good Business? G.Gabrielsen, K.Grønhaug, L.Kahle, T.Kristensen, T.Plenborg & R.Wilke
PART III: IMPLICATIONS
Epilogue; G.Rusten & J.R.Bryson


Authors

GRETE RUSTEN is a Professor at Department of Geography University of Bergen, Norway, and Honorary Research Fellow, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK. She is a Council member at the European Research Association on Services and Space (RESER). Her research focuses on firm strategies and location, industrial and regional development, service economy, innovation and design and other creative industries. She has several international publications including books, chapters and journal articles. 
 
JOHN R. BRYSON is Professor of Enterprise and Economic Geography and Head of the Society, Economy and Environment Research Group in the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Birmingham, UK and Vice-President of the European Association for Research on Services. He is author of Service Worlds: People, Organisations, Technologies and co-editor of The Handbook of Service Industries.