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Crime, Prosecution and Social Relations
 
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Crime, Prosecution and Social Relations
The Summary Courts of the City of London in the Late Eighteenth Century
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
13 Aug 2009
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£67.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230203976
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Crime, Prosecution and Social Relations offers a fascinating view of the social history of Georgian London through the hitherto neglected prism of the Summary courts. This study looks at how rich and poor Londoners used these courts to prosecute those that assaulted or stole from them; to negotiate better working conditions; and to punish prostitutes, vagrants and disorderly apprentices. It argues that while most previous work on crime has focused on the courts of assize and quarter session, and on offences that attracted sentences of hanging and transportation, it was at Summary level that most people experienced the law in this period. This is the first monograph to deal exclusively with the nature and role of summary proceedings in England in the long eighteenth century within the context of the social history of crime and the criminal justice system and therefore represents an important addition to our understanding of this area of history.


Description

Crime, Prosecution and Social Relations offers a fascinating view of the social history of Georgian London through the hitherto neglected prism of the Summary courts. This study looks at how rich and poor Londoners used these courts to prosecute those that assaulted or stole from them; to negotiate better working conditions; and to punish prostitutes, vagrants and disorderly apprentices. It argues that while most previous work on crime has focused on the courts of assize and quarter session, and on offences that attracted sentences of hanging and transportation, it was at Summary level that most people experienced the law in this period. This is the first monograph to deal exclusively with the nature and role of summary proceedings in England in the long eighteenth century within the context of the social history of crime and the criminal justice system and therefore represents an important addition to our understanding of this area of history.


Contents

Introduction
Locating the Summary Courts
Policing& Personnel: Constables and the Watching System
Property Offending in the City of London
Settling their Differences: The Prosecution of Interpersonal Violence
Regulating the Streets
Quelling the Smithfield Yahoos: Bullock-hunting on the Streets of London
The Regulation of Trade and Poverty
The People's Courts?
Bibliography


Authors

DREW GRAY is Senior Lecturer in the History of Crime at the University of Northampton, UK. His latest research project is studying the caseload of a Northamptonshire magistrate in the mid eighteenth century. His second book, London Shadows, a Study of Victorian Crime and Popular Culture, is due for publication in 2011.