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Television News, Politics and Young People
 
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Television News, Politics and Young People
Generation Disconnected?
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
09 Apr 2010
|
£58.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230219359
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Why are young people alienated from television news? This book argues that contemporary trends indicating deepening disconnection from news about public life reflect problems both with the way television news covers politics - which is the single biggest item on the news - and with the nature of politics itself under neo-liberal capitalism. The authors explore the representation of young people and politics on television news and suggest that there are links between these representations and why young people are turned off news programming. They ask both broadcasters and young people what they think can be done to address this issue, and examine the way that young people consume news. The book concludes that the problem is deep-rooted and requires profound changes both in our political culture and in the culture of television news.


Description

Why are young people alienated from television news? This book argues that contemporary trends indicating deepening disconnection from news about public life reflect problems both with the way television news covers politics - which is the single biggest item on the news - and with the nature of politics itself under neo-liberal capitalism. The authors explore the representation of young people and politics on television news and suggest that there are links between these representations and why young people are turned off news programming. They ask both broadcasters and young people what they think can be done to address this issue, and examine the way that young people consume news. The book concludes that the problem is deep-rooted and requires profound changes both in our political culture and in the culture of television news.


Reviews

'A wonderfully thought-provoking rejoinder to those who maintain that the media defends liberty through the dominance of the commercial market. Written by experienced scholars in the field who provide some fascinating insights into the hidden world of senior newscasters and producers.' - Brian D. Loader, University of York, UK
 
'...a well constructed book, with plenty of empirical material as well as argument.' - Soundings


Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
The Crisis of Political Representation
Young People, Politics and Television
Broadcasters' Perspectives
Content Analysis of Television News
The Symbolic Criminalisation of Young People
The Monopolisation of Political Discourse
The Boundaries of Political Debate: Animal Rights
Apathetic or Excluded? Young People, News and the Electronic Media
Talk Back: Young Audiences and Reception
Conclusion: Is Another Television News Paradigm Possible?
Bibliography
Notes
Index


Authors

MIKE WAYNE is Professor in Screen Media at Brunel University, UK.
 
CRAIG MURRAY has a Ph.D. from the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia. He has worked on research projects at Liverpool University and Brunel University in London, UK, and is currently chief media analyst at a media monitoring company in Oslo, Norway.

JULIAN PETLEY is Professor of Screen Media and Journalism in the School of Arts, Brunel University, UK. His most recent publication is Censorship: A Beginner's Guide (2009). He is co-principal editor of the Journal of British Cinema and Television, and chair of the Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom.

LESLEY HENDERSON is Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Communications in the School of Social Sciences, Brunel University, UK. She has published widely on factual and fictional media production and public understandings of diverse issues. Her most recent book is Social Issues in Television Fiction (2007).