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27 Nov 2009
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£66.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230575998
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

This edited collection explores the significance of a range of food practices for childhood identities in the context of children's everyday lives in different cultural settings. The relationship between children and food is currently high on the political agendas of many countries particularly in relation to matters such as childhood obesity and children's exposure to media discourses of various kinds. Within these, children's relationship with food is often problematized and yet we still know little about children's everyday encounters with food, or how they are positioned as consumers by television and marketing, but also by their mothers at home or by their peers at school. By exploring children's own everyday food encounters, alongside the ways in which childhood identities are constructed and mediated through food this volume provides a more measured and insightful understanding of the various and subtle dimensions of the relationship between children, food and identity than is normally headlined in the press. In drawing on empirical material from research in the UK, USA, and Europe, stretching from early babyhood through to middle childhood and youth, the volume also enables an understanding of the changing relationship between children, food and identity over time.


Description

This edited collection explores the significance of a range of food practices for childhood identities in the context of children's everyday lives in different cultural settings. The relationship between children and food is currently high on the political agendas of many countries particularly in relation to matters such as childhood obesity and children's exposure to media discourses of various kinds. Within these, children's relationship with food is often problematized and yet we still know little about children's everyday encounters with food, or how they are positioned as consumers by television and marketing, but also by their mothers at home or by their peers at school. By exploring children's own everyday food encounters, alongside the ways in which childhood identities are constructed and mediated through food this volume provides a more measured and insightful understanding of the various and subtle dimensions of the relationship between children, food and identity than is normally headlined in the press. In drawing on empirical material from research in the UK, USA, and Europe, stretching from early babyhood through to middle childhood and youth, the volume also enables an understanding of the changing relationship between children, food and identity over time.


Reviews

'...provides novel understandings of children's everyday food practices and experiences, any why children eat what they do. Such perspectives are notably missing from the public health debates about childhood obesity and could fill a significant gap...a valuable edition to Childhood Studies and Food Studies' - Canadian Journal of Sociology
 
'...[a] timely contribution...The editors succeed in their attempt to broaden our understanding by pointing to the complexity surrounding children as consumers and social actors across the ages and in different social and cultural locations when engaged in such an everyday practice as eating.' - Dr. Ulla Gustafsson, Network, BSA


Contents

Introduction; A.James, A.Kjørholt& V.Tingstad
'It depends what you mean by feeding on demand': Mothers' Accounts of Babies' Agency in Infant Feeding Relationships; H.Stapleton& J.Keenan
Negotiating Family, Negotiating Food: Children as Family Participants?; A.James, P.Curtis& K.Ellis
Consuming Fast Food: The Perceptions and Practices of Middle Class Young Teenagers; W.Wills, K.Backett-Milburn, J.Lawton& M.Roberts
Picturing the Lunchbox: Children Drawing and Talking about 'Dream' and 'Nightmare' Lunchboxes in the Primary School Setting; C.Dryden, A.Metcalfe, J.Owen& G.Shipton
Fathering through Food: Children's Perceptions of Fathers' Contributions to Family Food Practices; P.Curtis, A.James& K.Ellis
Children's Subjectivities and Commercial Meaning: The Delicate Battle Mothers Wage when Feeding their Children; D.Thomas Cook
Children's Becoming in Frontiering Foodscapes; H.Brembeck
Food and Relationships: Children's Experiences in Residential Care; S.Punch, I.McIntosh, R.Emond & N.Dorrer
Discourses on Child Obesity and TV Advertising in the Context of the Norwegian Welfare State; V.Tingstad
'I don't care if it does me good, I like it': Childhood, Health and Enjoyment in British Women's Magazine Food Advertising; J.Burridge
Bibliography


Authors

ALLISON JAMES is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Centre for the Study of Childhood and Youth at the University of Sheffield, UK. She is also Professor at Norwegian Centre for Child Research, Trondheim, Norway. As one of the pioneers of contemporary childhood studies she has published widely in the field. Her most recent publications include Constructing and Reconstructing Childhood (co-authored), Theorising Childhood (co-authored), Research with Children (co-edited), Constructing Childhood: Theory, Policy and Social Practice (co-authored), European Childhoods (co-edited) and Key Concepts in Childhood Studies (co-edited). 
  
ANNE TRINE KJØRHOLT is Associate Professor and Director of the Norwegian Centre for Child Research at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Her research interests include discourses on childhood, children's rights and citizenship, early childhood education and care. Among Kjørholt's publications are: Beyond Listening: Children's Perspectives in Early Childhood Services (co-edited), Children's Welfare (co-edited), Global Childhoods: Globalization, Development and Young People (co-edited).

VEBJØRG TINGSTAD is Associate Professor at the Norwegian Centre for Child Research at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Her research interests include childhood, media, consumption and food and her recent publications are Children's Chat on the Net: A Study of Children's Social Encounters in Two Norwegian Chat Rooms and Exploring Childhood-Growing up in a Changing Media Culture. She has written journal articles on childhood, commercial television and consumption and is an editor of the Nordic journal Barn.