Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
Theatre Censorship in Britain
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
Theatre Censorship in Britain
Silencing, Censure and Suppression
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
08 Apr 2009
|
£61.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230223783
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Why do people censor? How do we strike a balance between freedom of speech and respect for the sacred? Do we know what we mean by censorship? Theatre Censorship in Britain brings these questions to its exploration of the wide variety of censorship that has shaped theatrical performance in twentieth- and twenty-first century Britain. Its eight case studies assess the interventions of the Lord Chamberlain - who licensed every performance until 1968 - but they also analyse the powers of censure wielded by the media and public interest groups; the self-censorship of playwrights; and the constraints placed upon producers by public funding bodies and corporate sponsors. They examine the unpredictable outcomes of censorship, deep-seated anxieties about the performative influence of the stage, and the complex questions raised by acts of theatrical censorship and silencing in the context of contemporary debates over civil liberties and freedom of speech.


Description

Why do people censor? How do we strike a balance between freedom of speech and respect for the sacred? Do we know what we mean by censorship? Theatre Censorship in Britain brings these questions to its exploration of the wide variety of censorship that has shaped theatrical performance in twentieth- and twenty-first century Britain. Its eight case studies assess the interventions of the Lord Chamberlain - who licensed every performance until 1968 - but they also analyse the powers of censure wielded by the media and public interest groups; the self-censorship of playwrights; and the constraints placed upon producers by public funding bodies and corporate sponsors. They examine the unpredictable outcomes of censorship, deep-seated anxieties about the performative influence of the stage, and the complex questions raised by acts of theatrical censorship and silencing in the context of contemporary debates over civil liberties and freedom of speech.


Reviews

'...Freshwater has provided us with an excellent and wide-ranging study which will no doubt inspire scholars and students alike and will have a genuine and long-term impact on the discipline.' - Maggie B. Gale, New Theatre Quarterly


Contents


List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Introduction
London's Grand Guignol: Sex, Violence and the Negotiation of the Limit
The Representation of Reproduction: Marie Stopes and the Female Body
Suppressed Desire: Dramatic Inscriptions of Lesbianism
Soldiers: Playing with History
Mary Whitehouse, The Romans in Britain, and 'the Rape of our Senses'
Section 28: Contagion, Control and Protest
Capital Constraint: the Right to Choose?
Competing Fundamentalisms: Behzti, Freedom of Speech, Sacrilege and Silencing
Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index


Authors

HELEN FRESHWATER lectures at Birkbeck College, University of London, UK, where she specializes in twentieth-century British theatre and contemporary performance. She is author of Theatre and Audience.