Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
Counter-Terrorism, Aid and Civil Society
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
Counter-Terrorism, Aid and Civil Society
Before and After the War on Terror
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
29 Sep 2009
|
£69.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230229495
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Counter-Terrorism, Aid and Civil Society critically examines the effects of the War on Terror on the relationships between civil society, security and aid, drawing on original fieldwork in Afghanistan, India and Kenya. Although governments are avoiding use of the term 'War on Terror', post-9/11 counter-terrorism responses have been widely legislated, institutionalized and bureaucratized. Hence, the impacts of the War on Terror will be long-lasting. Specifically, the book proposes that the War on Terror has reshaped the field of international development, which has become increasingly oriented to address issues of national and international security. This has had clear implications for how government and aid agencies engage with civil societies at home and abroad. However, in many contexts, mainstream groups supported by governments have failed to respond vigorously to counter-terrorism responses, leaving human rights and Muslim groups that have borne the brunt of scrutiny to challenge the premise and need for new security practices, measures and laws.


Description

Counter-Terrorism, Aid and Civil Society critically examines the effects of the War on Terror on the relationships between civil society, security and aid, drawing on original fieldwork in Afghanistan, India and Kenya. Although governments are avoiding use of the term 'War on Terror', post-9/11 counter-terrorism responses have been widely legislated, institutionalized and bureaucratized. Hence, the impacts of the War on Terror will be long-lasting. Specifically, the book proposes that the War on Terror has reshaped the field of international development, which has become increasingly oriented to address issues of national and international security. This has had clear implications for how government and aid agencies engage with civil societies at home and abroad. However, in many contexts, mainstream groups supported by governments have failed to respond vigorously to counter-terrorism responses, leaving human rights and Muslim groups that have borne the brunt of scrutiny to challenge the premise and need for new security practices, measures and laws.


Reviews

"The book makes a valuable and significant contribution to many debates, e.g., on the wars on terrorism and their impact, on the securitisation of aid and development, both generally and in specific environments, on the changing role of civil society and its relationship with the state. Its logical structure, clear and engaging writing, wide-ranging sources and impressive level of detail, mean that the book will appeal to a variety of audiences, from scholars to policy-makers, from students to NGO workers." - LSE Review of Books


Contents

Introduction
Theorizing the Securitization of Aid and Effects on Civil Societies
Government-Civil Society Relations Post 9/11
Civil Society, Security and Aid: Shifting Donor Perspectives
Civil Society, Security and Aid Post 9/11: Afghanistan
Aid, Civil Society and the State in Kenya
Civil Society, Security and Aid in India
Conclusion


Authors

JUDE HOWELL is Professor and Director of the Centre for Civil Society at the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK. She has written extensively on civil society, governance, gender, security, the politics of development and China. Her recent books include Gender and Civil Society (with Diane Mulligan), Civil Society and Development (with Jenny Pearce) and Governance in China.

JEREMY LIND is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies. His research examines civil society, development and relief aid in situations of conflict and violence. He was lead editor of Scarcity and Surfeit: The Ecology of Africa's Conflicts.