Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
Language and Conflict in Northern Ireland and Canada
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
Language and Conflict in Northern Ireland and Canada
A Silent War
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
16 Jul 2010
|
£65.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230230651
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors


Janet Muller presents a unique contribution to understanding the interaction between language policy and planning and modern conflict resolution. Against the backdrop of Quebec/Canada since the 1995 Quebec referendum on secession, she provides an insider account from the North of Ireland, assessing through these two examples the interplay of conflict and language policy in the protection and promotion of languages in minoritised circumstances.
 
The author outlines recent language policy trends in Quebec/Canada and details the place occupied by the Irish language in Northern Irish peace negotiations prior to and after the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. She examines the extent to which promises of 'a new era' for the language have been fulfilled and analyses development in language policy and planning through broadcasting, the implementation of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages and the aftermath of the 2006 British government commitment to enact an Irish language Act. New materials and interviews relevant to both Quebec/Canada and the North of Ireland provide fresh perspectives on some of the challenges facing minoritised language communities. 


Description


Janet Muller presents a unique contribution to understanding the interaction between language policy and planning and modern conflict resolution. Against the backdrop of Quebec/Canada since the 1995 Quebec referendum on secession, she provides an insider account from the North of Ireland, assessing through these two examples the interplay of conflict and language policy in the protection and promotion of languages in minoritised circumstances.
 
The author outlines recent language policy trends in Quebec/Canada and details the place occupied by the Irish language in Northern Irish peace negotiations prior to and after the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. She examines the extent to which promises of 'a new era' for the language have been fulfilled and analyses development in language policy and planning through broadcasting, the implementation of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages and the aftermath of the 2006 British government commitment to enact an Irish language Act. New materials and interviews relevant to both Quebec/Canada and the North of Ireland provide fresh perspectives on some of the challenges facing minoritised language communities. 


Reviews

'...the book offers a valuable inside perspective of the links between community activism and the state when negotiating minority
issues.' - Philip McDermott, Current Issues in Language Planning


Contents

List of Figures and Tables
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Introduction
A Silent War. Conflict Resolution and Language Policy and Planning in Northern Ireland and Quebec / Canada
The Irish Language in the North of Ireland: Census Statistics Education
The Irish Language and the Good Friday Agreement
The Ratification and Application of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages in Respect of Irish
Irish Language Broadcasting since the Good Friday Agreement: Sop in áit na scuaibe? Sword or Ploughshare?
The British Government Commitment to Enact the Irish Language Act. Submissions from voluntary and state sector Irish language organisations to the First Public Consultation on Proposed Irish Language Legislation for NI
Submissions of the Political Parties to the First Public Consultation on Proposed Irish Language Legislation for NI
Submissions from Key Public Bodies and a 20 per cent Sample of Individual Responses to the Public Consultation on the Proposed Irish Language Legislation
Quebec v. The Rest in the Twenty-First Century. Coming-of-Age or Losing the Plot?
Conclusions
Endnotes
References
Index


Authors

JANET MULLER is Chief Executive of POBAL, the non-governmental umbrella organisation for the Irish speaking community in the North of Ireland. She has helped to spearhead groundbreaking Irish language and community initiatives and has shaped approaches to improve the status of the Irish language in the North, developing key campaigns, research and monitoring work on legislation, policy, best practice and community development. She has a PhD from the University of Ulster.