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08 Sep 2010
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£66.00
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9780230229891
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The wars of the period 1770–1830, including the North and South American wars of independence and the revolutionary and Napoleonic wars, are frequently considered to be the first wars fought by all combatants as 'national wars'. Yet they touched every continent of the globe. New ideas about citizenship, patriotism and national belonging circulated far beyond Europe and North America, as some European empires were fatally weakened and others greatly extended their power. This volume explores the impact of revolution and war in slave and free societies including southern India, the Caribbean, South America, and southern Africa. Articles discuss how experience of war helped to shape the individual and collective identities of men and women, slaves and soldiers, colonial rulers and indigenous peoples. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which men and women imagined themselves and their world, with reference to the complexities of gender, class, religion, race, ethnicity and nation.


Description

The wars of the period 1770–1830, including the North and South American wars of independence and the revolutionary and Napoleonic wars, are frequently considered to be the first wars fought by all combatants as 'national wars'. Yet they touched every continent of the globe. New ideas about citizenship, patriotism and national belonging circulated far beyond Europe and North America, as some European empires were fatally weakened and others greatly extended their power. This volume explores the impact of revolution and war in slave and free societies including southern India, the Caribbean, South America, and southern Africa. Articles discuss how experience of war helped to shape the individual and collective identities of men and women, slaves and soldiers, colonial rulers and indigenous peoples. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which men and women imagined themselves and their world, with reference to the complexities of gender, class, religion, race, ethnicity and nation.


Contents

Maps and Illustrations
Series Foreword
Acknowledgements
Notes on Contributors
List of Abbreviations
Introduction: War, Empire and Slavery, 1770–1830; R.Bessel, N.Guyatt& J.Rendall
PART I: A WORLD IN UPHEAVAL
The 'Revolutionary Age' in the Wider World, c. 1790–1830; C.A.Bayly
The Revolutionary Abolitionists of Haiti; L.Dubois
Race and Slavery in the Making of Arab France, 1802–1815; I.Coller
The Making of Warriors: The Militarization of the Rio de la Plata, 1806–1807; A.Rabinovich
PART II: FREEDOM AND CAPTIVITY
The French Conspiracy: Paranoia and Opportunism on the Eve of Independence in Buenos Aires; L.L.Johnson
Armed with Swords and Ostrich Feathers: Militarism and Cultural Revolution in the Cape Slave Uprising of 1808; N.Worden
Jacques-Pierre Brissot and the Fate of Atlantic Antislavery during the Age of Revolutionary Wars; M-J.Rossignol
Borderlands of Empire, Borderlands of Race; J.Winch
PART III: IDENTITY AND DIFFERENCE
The French Revolutionary Wars in the Spanish American Imagination, 1810–1830; R.Earle
Old Subjects, New Subjects, and Non-Subjects: Silences and Subjecthood in Late Eighteenth-Century Grenada; C.Anderson
The Russian Empire: Military Encounters and National Identity; J.Hartley
War, Empire, and the 'Other': Iranian-European Encounters in the 'Napoleonic' Era'; J.de Groot
Patriotism, Painting and the Portuguese Empire during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars; F.Vlachou
Index


Authors


RICHARD BESSEL is Professor of Twentieth Century History at the University of York, UK. Previously he taught at the Open University and has held visiting chairs at the Universities of Bielefeld and Freiburg. His most recent books are Germany 1945: From War to Peace, and (ed. With Claudia Haake), Removing Peoples: Forced Removal in the Modern World, both published in 2009.
 
NICHOLAS GUYATT is a Lecturer in Modern History at the University of York, UK. He specializes in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century American Intellectual and Political History. He is the author of Providence and the Invention of the United States, 1607-1876 (Cambridge).

JANE RENDALL taught for many years at the University of York, in the History Department, the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies and the Centre for Women's Studies, and is now an Honorary Fellow there. She has published widely in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century women's and gender history.