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21 Sep 2011
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£28.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9780230297883
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

For the last 20 years, companies have been adopting and implementing large-scale information systems, providing the backbone of many organizations worldwide. The implementation of these platforms has to be carried out with clear strategic and operational
aims: to automate transactions, reduce costs, increase customer satisfaction, integrate with suppliers, and ultimately make better decisions.

And yet, companies find this experience to be not as easy as they initially anticipate. Projects are harder, business cases are more difficult, and the learning process is much, much longer. Why is this happening? And what do firms do to ensure that they get value from their investment in technology?

The reality is that it takes a long time and a lot of learning to get the best out of your IT systems. What businesses really need now is to stop looking for the next technology silver bullet and make the most of what they already have. In short, businesses need to maximize the value of their existing IT assets.

To succeed in the coming years, companies must continue and intensify what these authors call 'The Long Conversation' – the strategic and operational dialogues that businesses began years ago. Companies do not need to reach first for new hardware and/or software, but they do need new organizational practices, new capabilities and new social networks to support the continuity of that conversation.


Description

For the last 20 years, companies have been adopting and implementing large-scale information systems, providing the backbone of many organizations worldwide. The implementation of these platforms has to be carried out with clear strategic and operational
aims: to automate transactions, reduce costs, increase customer satisfaction, integrate with suppliers, and ultimately make better decisions.

And yet, companies find this experience to be not as easy as they initially anticipate. Projects are harder, business cases are more difficult, and the learning process is much, much longer. Why is this happening? And what do firms do to ensure that they get value from their investment in technology?

The reality is that it takes a long time and a lot of learning to get the best out of your IT systems. What businesses really need now is to stop looking for the next technology silver bullet and make the most of what they already have. In short, businesses need to maximize the value of their existing IT assets.

To succeed in the coming years, companies must continue and intensify what these authors call 'The Long Conversation' – the strategic and operational dialogues that businesses began years ago. Companies do not need to reach first for new hardware and/or software, but they do need new organizational practices, new capabilities and new social networks to support the continuity of that conversation.


Reviews

'Today's corporations succeed or fail, in part, according to their ability to manage enterprise systems (large and complex computerized systems with cost typically in the millions of dollars). The Long Conversation examines how organizations learn not only to live with enterprise systems, but also achieve goals beyond those they set out to achieve. This book closes the gap between rhetoric and practice. It provides tools to manage the dialogue (and learning) that takes place in diffusing new technological capabilities, growing mastery, and adapting the organization's business model. It is a must read for those who are interested in enterprise systems implementation.' – Dr Ramiro Montealegre, Professor of Information Systems at the University of Colorado, Boulder, USA

'In our constantly changing complex business world, IT/Enterprise Systems are an excellent asset which can offer great added value to an organization. Implementing such IT and getting the most out of it however can be a long and difficult path with lots of obstacles on the way. One can easily get lost in the maze of technical possibilities. Therefore, especially when 'rolling out' such IT at different legal entities of a global operating business, it is of vital importance also to focus on people and processes. The Long Conversation gives a concise overview plus practical hints on how not to lose track and how to keep focused on the issue. Case studies from different industry sectors make it easy to get valuable help and guidance.' – Frank Seeger, Head of Logistics, Bayer Health Care, Madrid

'… a vital and long overdue book to help Executives understand that deriving value from technology investment is not just about technology, but about the organizational behaviours and processes that give substance to the IT infrastructure.' – Professor John Beckford, Loughborough University & Beckford Consulting, UK


Contents

Foreword
Preface
The Technology Wave, Organizations and Economic Reality
Enterprise Systems: The Technology We Already Have
Biological Evolution: Osmosis, Growth and Adaptation
Mastery is a Long Conversation
Building Organizational Capabilities for the Long Conversation
The Next Technology Wave
Practical Implications
Index
End notes
Selected Bibliography


Authors

OSWALDO LORENZO is Professor of Management at IE Business School, Madrid, Spain. He is specialized in three areas of knowledge and management: innovation, supply chain management, and information technology & business process management. His research interests lie in the implementation, assimilation and diffusion of enterprise systems for the purpose of improving processes and supply chains. Professor Lorenzo's extensive experience in this field has led organizations in different sectors (e.g. automobile, banking, government, and energy) to contract his consulting services. He has been visiting professor at Manchester Business School (UK),IESA Business School (Venezuela), INCAE (Costa Rica) and Bordeaux School of Management (France). Part of his experience comes from his work on publications for specialized journals like California Management Review, Journal of Business Ethics, Supply Chain Management Review, Communications of the Association for Information Systems, International Journal of Simulation and Process Modeling, Revista de Empresa, and Revista Latinoamericana de Administración.

PETER KAWALEK is Professor of Information Systems and Strategy at Manchester Business School (UK). In addition, he has experience through different roles and contributions in Warwick Business School (UK), Instituto de Empresa Business School (Spain), and Letterkenny Institute of Technology. Professionally, Professor Kawalek has worked to board level with companies, on short projects with government ministers, and at all sorts of levels with public sector agencies. These organisations include O2, Jaguar Cars, SAP, Chubb Insurance Company of Europe, BT, GNER, Journey 9, United Utilities, Hoverspeed, Fujitsu, Department of Communities and Local Government, Cabinet Office, Office an Taoiseach, Salford City Council, Oldham Council, Leeds City Council, and the NHS.

GASTÓN GONZÁLEZ is Partner and Director of Expertia Consulting Group, a Multinational Management Consulting Firm. He has extensive experience as Professor of Strategy, Organization, and Information Technology at IESA Business School and The Universidad Simón Bolívar in Caracas, Venezuela. This experience has been combined with more than twenty four years working in the consulting field to different countries and sectors in topics such as corporate governance, business process management and business model innovation. His recognized vision, professional ability and methodological strengths have allowed him to be part of successful business cases of leading companies in several sectors (e.g. financial services, media, telecommunications, consumer goods, food & beverages, technology and retail). Mr. Gastón González has worked for board level in different companies in Latin-American and he is member of The Strategic Management Society. His MBA focused in Strategy and Corporate Finance from The University of Miami, USA. He also holds Masters in Control System from The University of Michigan, USA, and BSc. in Electronic Engineering from The Universidad Simón Bolívar, Caracas - Venezuela.

BEN RAMDANI research interests lie in IT-enabled business change, particularly in the role required of senior managers to successfully orchestrate such change. His research investigates how senior managers can most effectively select, implement, and deploy IT to achieve business goals. His current research falls in two categories: (1) to investigate how firms can build capabilities to deliver incremental business value from IT, and (2) to explore disruptive change and how businesses that may be well managed, customer-friendly, and technologically advanced-they are still susceptible to failure or to being overtaken by upstart competitors. Dr. Ramdani's experience includes a consulting activity focused on advising firms on IT and strategy related matters and how to unlock business value from their IT investments. Until recently, he was sponsored by CA, the world's leading independent provider of IT management software, as a research fellow at Cranfield School of Management to investigate how firms can realize additional business value from their IT investments. He has been involved in a number of projects including Transferring Across Local Knowledge (TALK), and Social Inclusion through the Digital Economy (SiDE). Dr Ramdani has been a visiting lecturer at both Manchester Business School (UK) and IE Business School (Spain). He received his Ph.D. from Manchester Business School, his MBA and BSc from Leeds University Business School, UK.