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Monetary Economics
 
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Monetary Economics
An Integrated Approach to Credit, Money, Income, Production and Wealth
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
01 Dec 2006
|
£105.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780230500556
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

This book challenges the mainstream paradigm, which is based on the inter-temporal optimisation of welfare by individual agents. It introduces a new methodology for studying how it is institutions (firms, banks, governments, foreigners and households) which create flows of income, expenditure and production together with stocks of assets (including money) and liabilities, thereby determining how whole economies evolve through time. It is a central contention that any realistic representation of a monetary economy must be grounded in a fully articulated system of national income and flow of funds accounts which is so complete that the nth variable is logically implied by the other n-1. As the financial balances of each sector have exact counterparts in changes in stock variables, historical time is introduced into the basic system of concepts, with asset and liability stocks providing the link between each period and each succeeding period.
It is taken as axiomatic that decisions are based on expectations about the future reached under conditions of uncertainty, so for every sector there must exist at least one flexible option or "buffer" over which that sector has no direct control and which adjusts passively when expectations are falsified. For firms the buffer will normally take the form of inventories, for banks and governments it will be stocks of government securities, for households it will be stocks of credit money. Accordingly, outside financial markets there is neither need nor place for equilibrium conditions to bring supply into equivalence with demand. It will almost always be quantities rather than prices which give the signals which keep the economy on track.
Starting with extremely simple stock flow consistent (SFC) models, the text describes a succession of increasingly complex models, using a conventional narrative style backed up by equations which bring precision to individual propositions. However, underlying each narrative there exists a simulation model constructed with such rigour that, in harmony with its basis in comprehensive accounting, there is always one equation which is implied logically by all the others. Solutions of these models are used to illustrate, with charts, ways in which whole economies evolve when shocked in various ways. Readers will be able to download all the models and explore their properties for themselves.
A major conclusion is that economies require management via fiscal and monetary policy if full employment without inflation is to be achieved.


Description

This book challenges the mainstream paradigm, which is based on the inter-temporal optimisation of welfare by individual agents. It introduces a new methodology for studying how it is institutions (firms, banks, governments, foreigners and households) which create flows of income, expenditure and production together with stocks of assets (including money) and liabilities, thereby determining how whole economies evolve through time. It is a central contention that any realistic representation of a monetary economy must be grounded in a fully articulated system of national income and flow of funds accounts which is so complete that the nth variable is logically implied by the other n-1. As the financial balances of each sector have exact counterparts in changes in stock variables, historical time is introduced into the basic system of concepts, with asset and liability stocks providing the link between each period and each succeeding period.
It is taken as axiomatic that decisions are based on expectations about the future reached under conditions of uncertainty, so for every sector there must exist at least one flexible option or "buffer" over which that sector has no direct control and which adjusts passively when expectations are falsified. For firms the buffer will normally take the form of inventories, for banks and governments it will be stocks of government securities, for households it will be stocks of credit money. Accordingly, outside financial markets there is neither need nor place for equilibrium conditions to bring supply into equivalence with demand. It will almost always be quantities rather than prices which give the signals which keep the economy on track.
Starting with extremely simple stock flow consistent (SFC) models, the text describes a succession of increasingly complex models, using a conventional narrative style backed up by equations which bring precision to individual propositions. However, underlying each narrative there exists a simulation model constructed with such rigour that, in harmony with its basis in comprehensive accounting, there is always one equation which is implied logically by all the others. Solutions of these models are used to illustrate, with charts, ways in which whole economies evolve when shocked in various ways. Readers will be able to download all the models and explore their properties for themselves.
A major conclusion is that economies require management via fiscal and monetary policy if full employment without inflation is to be achieved.


Reviews



'The framework that Godley and Lavoie develop, with a consistent numerical and simulational handle on the various models, is a return to a majestic Wicksellian tradition…A whole generation of graduate students have been brought up on policy nihilism, bordering on paralysis in the face of policy dilemmas. A new generation, armed with the tools, concepts and models developed by Godley and Lavoie, can now return to the grand traditions of macroeconomics as an experimental science, focusing on policy.' – K. Vela Velupillai, Fellow, Girton College, Cambridge, UK, and Professor of Economics, University of Trento, Italy
 
'Wynne Godley has been the moving force behind keeping quantitative non-mainstream macroeconomics alive and flourishing for the last several decades...His work is inspiring, and will guide policy-oriented macroeconomic modellers for decades to come.' – Lance Taylor, Cambridge Journal of Economics

 
'...[This] clearly deserves to become a standard reference for everybody interested in SFC modelling in particular and modern macroeconomics in general. There are already first signs that other economists are indeed inspired by this way of thinking about the economy...' - Till van Treeck, Intervention, European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies
 


Contents

Introduction
Balance Sheets, Transaction Matrices and The Monetary Circuit
The Simplest Model with Government Money
Government Money with Portfolio Choice
Long-Term Bonds, Capital Gains and Liquidity Preference
Introducing the Open Economy
A Simple Model with Private Bank Money
Time, Inventories, Profits and Pricing
A Model with PrivateBank Money, Inventories and Inflation
A Model with both Inside and Outside Money
A Growth Model Prototype
Open Economy with Flexible Prices and Exchange Rates
General Conclusion


Authors

WYNNE GODLEY was formerly Director of the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Cambridge, UK, from 1970 to 1994, and subsequently a Professor of Applied Economics. During this period, from 1987-1988, he was also a Visiting Professor at University of Aalborg, Denmark. Between 1994 and 2001, Professor Godley was a Distinguished Scholar at the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, New York. Professor Godley joined CERF as a Visiting Research Associate in 2002.

MARC LAVOIE is Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Ottawa, Canada. He has been Visiting Professor at Curtin University, Australia, and at the universities of Bordeaux, Grenoble, Lille, Limoges, Nice, Rennes, Paris-1 and Paris-13. His main research areas are in post-Keynesian and monetary economics. He has written over 130 journal articles or book chapters as well as authoring Foundations of Post-Keynesian Economics and co-edited Central Banking in the Modern World.