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British Emigration, 1603-1914
 
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British Emigration, 1603-1914
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
15 Oct 2004
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£79.00
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9780333764916
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

British History is often presented in terms of empire and imperialism rather than in more human terms, while the essence of emigration is its human element. It was the most fundamental action working people could take in regard to their lives and their futures, yet often emigration is discussed in general terms of movement of 'peoples'. This book is intended to interrogate ideas of British identity through the political issue and human experience of emigration from Britain and Ireland from 1603 to 1914.
While British emigration is often portrayed as central to the development of the British empire, its principal destination, the United States, is least known in its history. British Emigration 1603-1914 is intended to discuss that essential characteristic of the phenomenon in relation to competing traditions of British and Irish identity.


Description

British History is often presented in terms of empire and imperialism rather than in more human terms, while the essence of emigration is its human element. It was the most fundamental action working people could take in regard to their lives and their futures, yet often emigration is discussed in general terms of movement of 'peoples'. This book is intended to interrogate ideas of British identity through the political issue and human experience of emigration from Britain and Ireland from 1603 to 1914.
While British emigration is often portrayed as central to the development of the British empire, its principal destination, the United States, is least known in its history. British Emigration 1603-1914 is intended to discuss that essential characteristic of the phenomenon in relation to competing traditions of British and Irish identity.


Reviews

'Murdoch suggests that many of the emigrants were people who were, in effect, rejecting social change and hoping to recover abroad the worlds they were losing at home. He offers similarly probing ideas about the transfer of class attitudes and the Americanization of the English emigrants, as well as the role of return migration. His compact essays sparkle with thoughtful ideas relevant to the entire evolution of the Anglo world.' - Journal of British Studies

'his compacts essays sparkle with thoughtful ideas relevant to the entire evolution of the Anglo World'- Eric Richardson, Journal of British Studies


Contents

The Stuart Monarchy and Emigration
Unplanned Emigration 1688-1763
Flight to the West 1763-1803
Australia as the New America
Assisted Emigration
British Emigrants in the United States
British Emigration to Canada
The Emigrant Experience


Authors

ALEXANDER MURDOCH is Senior Lecturer in Scottish History in the School of History and Classics at the University of Edinburgh, UK.