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The Stasi
 
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The Stasi
The East German Intelligence and Security Service
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
04 Nov 1996
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£105.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9780333630945
||
 
 
11 Oct 1999
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£41.99
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9780333772072
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Second only to the KGB, the Stasi was the Soviet Bloc's most effective spy organiz-ation. Although it was employed mainly against West Germany, it successfully infiltrated NATO, the European Community, the US Department of Defense, NSA, and had agents at British and other universities. Even more sinister was its internal secret police role. It employed more informers than Hitler's Gestapo. In its efforts to bolster the sagging East German regime it used teacher against student, doctor against patient, friend against friend and even husband against wife. British experts, Childs and Popplewell, tell this amazing story for the first time in English. They reveal how the Stasi exploited ambition, idealism, fear, greed, romance and sex to gain and hold its agents. They trace the Stasi's origins in the dreaded Soviet Cheka, outline its development, structure, organization, personnel, system of rewards and punishments and much more. Based on interviews with Stasi officers and their victims, archival sources, published material, and years of personal experience, their book will be of interest both to the specialist and the general reader.


Description

Second only to the KGB, the Stasi was the Soviet Bloc's most effective spy organiz-ation. Although it was employed mainly against West Germany, it successfully infiltrated NATO, the European Community, the US Department of Defense, NSA, and had agents at British and other universities. Even more sinister was its internal secret police role. It employed more informers than Hitler's Gestapo. In its efforts to bolster the sagging East German regime it used teacher against student, doctor against patient, friend against friend and even husband against wife. British experts, Childs and Popplewell, tell this amazing story for the first time in English. They reveal how the Stasi exploited ambition, idealism, fear, greed, romance and sex to gain and hold its agents. They trace the Stasi's origins in the dreaded Soviet Cheka, outline its development, structure, organization, personnel, system of rewards and punishments and much more. Based on interviews with Stasi officers and their victims, archival sources, published material, and years of personal experience, their book will be of interest both to the specialist and the general reader.


Reviews

'This book helps us fill an important gap in our understanding of both the GDR and the Soviet bloc as a whole.' - Professor Christopher Andrew, Daily Telegraph

'Childs and Popplewell give...a fine overview... well-written and enjoyable.' - Jeffrey Kopstein, Europe-Asia Studies ,University of Glasgow

'The first book in English based largely on revelations from this astonishing archive...[It] helps us fill an important gap in our understanding of both the GDR and the Soviet bloc as a whole.' - Chris Andrew, The Daily Telegraph

'A valuable work...based on detailed research, some of it in previously secret archives, and personal experience of the German communist state.' - Peter Johnson, former BBC/Reuters correspondent, East Berlin/Moscow, British-German Review


Contents

Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
German Communism, the Comintern and Secret Intelligence, 1918-43
The Origins and Development of East German State Security: the Ulbricht Years, 1945-71
The MfS, SED and the East German State
The MfS as an Internal Security Organ
East German Foreign Intelligence, 1945-89
HVA Operations against West Germany
From Triumph to Catastrophe: the Stasi under Mielke and Honecker, 1971-89
Aftermath - Biographical Information
Chronology
Bibliography
Index of Persons
General Index


Authors

DAVID CHILDS is Professor of Politics at Nottingham University. Among his 15 other works are Germany in the 20th Century, GDR: Moscow's German Ally and East Germany to the 1990s: Can it Resist Glasnost? He predicted the demise of the East German regime in 1988 and was himself spied upon by the Stasi in Britain as well as in Germany. He has published many contributions on Germany in The Independent, The Times and elsewhere.

RICHARD POPPLEWELL is Lecturer in Politics at the University of Salford. He was Bradley Fellow at Georgetown University, Washington, DC, after completing his PhD at Cambridge in 1988. Dr Popplewell worked in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office before taking up academic work. His study of the British imperial intelligence service will be published next year.