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The Economics of Alfred Marshall
 
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The Economics of Alfred Marshall
Revisiting Marshall's Legacy
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
26 Nov 2002
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£97.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403901682
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Alfred Marshall (1842-1924) was one of the economists of the Cambridge school, whose thinking evolved into a mixture of utilitarianism, evolutionism and German idealism. He is equal in influence to other evolutionary economists such as Pigou and Jevons, and also addressed issues such as demand theory and welfare economics. The Economics of Alfred Marshall brings together a number of leading international scholars for a timely reappraisal of Marshall's contribution to the development of the field of economics. The aims of the contributors are firstly to revisit the work of Alfred Marshall and to investigate the unity of his projects which contemporary authors often tend to underestimate; and secondly to show how Marshall's approach is not only a subject for historians of economic thought, but may also provide a message which is still relevant for the progress of economics today.


Description

Alfred Marshall (1842-1924) was one of the economists of the Cambridge school, whose thinking evolved into a mixture of utilitarianism, evolutionism and German idealism. He is equal in influence to other evolutionary economists such as Pigou and Jevons, and also addressed issues such as demand theory and welfare economics. The Economics of Alfred Marshall brings together a number of leading international scholars for a timely reappraisal of Marshall's contribution to the development of the field of economics. The aims of the contributors are firstly to revisit the work of Alfred Marshall and to investigate the unity of his projects which contemporary authors often tend to underestimate; and secondly to show how Marshall's approach is not only a subject for historians of economic thought, but may also provide a message which is still relevant for the progress of economics today.


Contents

Notes on the Contributors
Introductory Remarks; R.Arena & M.Quéré
PART I: THE LEGACY OF MARSHALL'S ECONOMICS
The Return of the 'White Elephant'; G.Becattini
Dealing with Complexity - Marshall and Keynes on the Nature of Economic Thinking; R.Marchionatti
Alfred Marshall on Social Capital; D.Reisman
Marshall's Objective: Making Orthodox Economics Intelligible to Business Leaders; L.S.Moss
Alfred Marshall's Partial Equilibrium: Dynamics in Disguise; M.Dardi
Competition and Evolution: The Marshallian Conciliation Enterprise; P.Groenewegen
PART II: ECONOMIC EVOLUTION AND THE ORGANIZATIONOF INDUSTRY: MARSHALLIAN INSIGHTS
Alfred Marshall's Principles and Industry and Trade: Two Books or One? Marshall and the Joint Stock Company; J.K.Whitaker
From the Representative to the Equilibrium Firm: Why Marshall was not a Marshallian?; N.Hart
Increasing Returns and Competition: Learning From a Marshallian Perspective; M.Quéré
Efficiency and Time; B.J.Loasby
Organization and Knowledge in Marshall's Economics; R.Arena
Some Remarks on Marshallian External Economies and Industrial Tendencies; M.Bellandi
Requirements and Patterns of Marshallian Evolution: Their Impact on the Notion of Industrial District; T.Raffaelli


Authors

RICHARD ARENA is Professor of Economics at the University of Nice-Sophia-Antipolis. He was one of the founders of the European Society for the History of Economic Thought. He has edited several books on the history of economic thought, including studies of Keynes, Sraffa and Schumpeter.

MICHEL QUÉRÉ is Research Professor in Economics at the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS-IDEFI). His research interests include the history of economic thought, theory of the firm and the economics of innovation. He has written several works on the economics of Alfred Marshall.