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Jewish Resistance During the Holocaust
 
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Jewish Resistance During the Holocaust
Moral Uses of Violence and Will
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
06 Jul 2004
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£30.50
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781403939074
||
 
 
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The effectiveness of both political and spiritual resistance by Jews during the Holocaust is little understood. The general belief is that Jews did little to resist but the evidence shows just the opposite. The Jews resisted in considerable numbers and resisted against a regime and collaborators that dedicated themselves to their death. This book tells the story of Jewish violent and spiritual resistance; how powerful violent resistance was in sustaining personal and collective identity and how violent resistance saved lives, punished collaborators and threw roadblocks into the German policy of mass murder. Jews in the undergrounds and partisan communities demonstrated enormous courage under almost impossible odds. And their actions were often fierce and uncompromising. Yet the very fierceness of resistance raised moral issues that survivors even now find troubling. Spiritual resistance, as well, tells a story of unarmed, defenseless Jews unwilling to give up their faith, refusing to allow their will to be broken by German aggression. While spiritual resistance saved few lives, it still enabled Jews to sustain an identity and courage in the midst of the horror of mass shootings, gas chambers and crematoria.


Description

The effectiveness of both political and spiritual resistance by Jews during the Holocaust is little understood. The general belief is that Jews did little to resist but the evidence shows just the opposite. The Jews resisted in considerable numbers and resisted against a regime and collaborators that dedicated themselves to their death. This book tells the story of Jewish violent and spiritual resistance; how powerful violent resistance was in sustaining personal and collective identity and how violent resistance saved lives, punished collaborators and threw roadblocks into the German policy of mass murder. Jews in the undergrounds and partisan communities demonstrated enormous courage under almost impossible odds. And their actions were often fierce and uncompromising. Yet the very fierceness of resistance raised moral issues that survivors even now find troubling. Spiritual resistance, as well, tells a story of unarmed, defenseless Jews unwilling to give up their faith, refusing to allow their will to be broken by German aggression. While spiritual resistance saved few lives, it still enabled Jews to sustain an identity and courage in the midst of the horror of mass shootings, gas chambers and crematoria.


Reviews

'No book on Jewish resistance during the Holocaust is better than James Glass's. The scope of his analysis, which ranges from the armed resistance of partisan groups to the spiritual resistance of Orthodox rabbis in the Holocaust's ghettos, is unrivaled. The depth of his reflection, which not only lays to rest the long-lived stereotype that Jews were passive victims in the Holocaust but also explores the ethical and religious beliefs that informed different and, at times, conflicting approaches to resistance, is more penetrating than anything previously written on such topics. Original in its scholarship, making skillful use of documents and oral testimony, and written in a captivating style, this book is a superb addition to the study of the Holocaust and its implications.' - Professor John K. Roth, Director, Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights, Claremont McKenna College, California, USA

'Jewish Resistance During the Holocaust provides important new information about how Strictly Orthodox Jews coped with the uniquely diabolical situation of Nazi genocide. The whole field of Orthodox Jewry and the Holocaust remains underexplored, and this book gives us valuable new material.' - Professor William D. Rubinstein, Department of History, University of Wales-Aberystwyth, UK.


Contents

Introduction: Memory, Resistance and Reclaiming Self
The Moral Justification of Killing
Collective Trauma: The Disintegration of Ethics
The Moral Position of Violence: Bielski Survivors
The Moral Goodness of Violence: Necessity in the Forests
Spiritual Resistance: Understanding its Meaning
Condemned Spirit and the Moral Arguments of Faith
The Silence of Faith Facing the Emptied-out Self
Law and Spirit in Terrible Times
Index
Bibliography


Authors

JAMES M. GLASS is Professor of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland, College Park. He was named University Distinguished Scholar Teacher, 2002-2003. He has published numerous books combining psychological perspectives with issues in political theory and philosophy, including extensive research on the implications of the internal emotional world for political theory. During the past decade he has been engaged in research on the Holocaust, and the power of race hatred in generating mass murder.