Palgrave Macmillan Home
Login or Register    Shopping Basket Shopping Basket
Search 
 
 
 
 
The Sociology of African American Language
 
   Enlarge Image
 
 
The Sociology of African American Language
A Language Planning Perspective
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
13 Dec 2005
|
£76.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403939708
||
 
 
eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


OrderHelpBox
                                                                                                                                              returns, payment and delivery


DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The events and issues following the infamous Oakland School Board resolution on Ebonics are shown to be the tip of a metaphorical iceberg referred to as the Ebonics phenomenon. It includes the body of linguistic knowledge on Black English, the critical reaction to it by Afrocentric scholars under the banner of Ebonics, the visceral reactions of members of the general public to the incongruous idea of Ebonics 'being taught in the schools', and the pundits and politicians who shape relevant laws and policies. From the perspective of African Americans, the Ebonics phenomenon is a manifestation of the double consciousness of being pulled in two directions at once - toward the benefits of standard English speech and the intrinsic worth and beauty of talking Black. Such are the themes that pervade the book - woven into chapters that focus on one specific aspect or another of the structure of African American language, its origin and history, its role in the black community and performing arts, and implications of all the above for the literacy achievement of African American learners.


Description

The events and issues following the infamous Oakland School Board resolution on Ebonics are shown to be the tip of a metaphorical iceberg referred to as the Ebonics phenomenon. It includes the body of linguistic knowledge on Black English, the critical reaction to it by Afrocentric scholars under the banner of Ebonics, the visceral reactions of members of the general public to the incongruous idea of Ebonics 'being taught in the schools', and the pundits and politicians who shape relevant laws and policies. From the perspective of African Americans, the Ebonics phenomenon is a manifestation of the double consciousness of being pulled in two directions at once - toward the benefits of standard English speech and the intrinsic worth and beauty of talking Black. Such are the themes that pervade the book - woven into chapters that focus on one specific aspect or another of the structure of African American language, its origin and history, its role in the black community and performing arts, and implications of all the above for the literacy achievement of African American learners.


Reviews

'...the work makes good recommendations for next steps that linguists and activists can take to raise the status of AA and hopefully make education language policy and culturally relevant pedagogy easier to implement.' - Julia Deak, Current Issues in Language Planning


Contents

Dedication
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Linguists as Visionaries
If it Ain't Broke Don't Fix It: Toward a Policy of Full Recognition of African American Language
Language Planning as a Field of Inquiry
What's in a Name?
Where did African American Language Come From?
Language in the African Diaspora: The Case of Samaná English
The Language Situation in the African American Speech Community: The Status of Variety X
Cross-Over: From African American to National and World Culture
Ebonics and Black School Achievement: The Language Difference Hypothesis
The Grammar: We Be Following Rules
The Standardization of African American Language
References
Index


Authors

CHARLES DEBOSE is Professor of English at California State University, East Bay, California, USA. His scholarly interests include sociolinguistics, pidgin and creole linguistics and language planning and policy, especially as it informs the academic achievement of African American children. He is an ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church.