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From Civil Rights to Armalites
 
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From Civil Rights to Armalites
Derry and the Birth of the Irish Troubles
2nd Edition
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
 
17 Dec 2004
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£86.00
|Hardback In Stock
  
9781403944306
||
 
 
14 Dec 2004
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£29.50
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9781403944313
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

From Civil Rights to Armalites traces and analyses the gradual escalation of conflict in Northern Ireland from the first civil rights marches in 1968 to the verge of full-scale civil war in 1972, focusing on the city of Derry. Derry was at the heart of the early civil rights campaign and it was in Derry in January 1972 that the events of Bloody Sunday marked a defining moment in the escalating conflict. This detailed local study seeks to explain how a peaceful civil rights campaign gave way to increasing violence and how the most moderate and conservative sections of the Catholic community gradually became deeply hostile to the state. It provides an explanation of how the IRA became a major political force and how the British army became a major party to the conflict. A new chapter on Bloody Sunday brings significant new material to the public debate around the Bloody Sunday Inquiry, placing the events of the day in the context of well-established patterns of conflict and secret negotiation which had gradually developed in Derry over the previous three years.


Description

From Civil Rights to Armalites traces and analyses the gradual escalation of conflict in Northern Ireland from the first civil rights marches in 1968 to the verge of full-scale civil war in 1972, focusing on the city of Derry. Derry was at the heart of the early civil rights campaign and it was in Derry in January 1972 that the events of Bloody Sunday marked a defining moment in the escalating conflict. This detailed local study seeks to explain how a peaceful civil rights campaign gave way to increasing violence and how the most moderate and conservative sections of the Catholic community gradually became deeply hostile to the state. It provides an explanation of how the IRA became a major political force and how the British army became a major party to the conflict. A new chapter on Bloody Sunday brings significant new material to the public debate around the Bloody Sunday Inquiry, placing the events of the day in the context of well-established patterns of conflict and secret negotiation which had gradually developed in Derry over the previous three years.


Reviews

Reviews of Previous Edition:

'...it offers a vivid portrayal, vibrating with contemporary relevance... Stylistically, this reads more like a work of investigative journalism than an academic treatise... a splendid, lively, sharp account.' - Eamonn McCann, Sunday Tribune

'..written in a manner that is both scholarly and accessible to the general reader...manages to be balanced without ever concealing the author's evident passion for the city and its people. This really is a superb piece of work.' - Colin Coulter, Bullán: An Irish Studies Journal

'...excellent book. What takes centre stage in this account is not the grand operas of high politics or totalising ideologies, but the popular airs of community, family and friendship networks, of local political activity and goals and the local experience of confrontation and conflict...It is this focus...that makes From Civil Rights to Armalites such a compelling read.' - Mark McGovern, Irish Political Studies

'It is rare indeed...to find a book about Derry which provides meticulously detailed nationalist and loyalist histories of the period 1968-1972, which is true to events - and yet is still gripping reading.' - Derry Journal


Contents

Introduction
Civil Rights October 1968 - July 1969
Unionist Collapse and Adaptation January 1969 - June 1970
Free Derry August - October 1969
The British Army August 1969 - April 1970
Republican Revival August 1969 - August 1970
Reform and Repression August 1970 - July 1971
On to a New Plane After 1971
Bloody Sunday in Context
Conclusion
Maps
Bibliography


Authors

NIALL Ó. DOCHARTAIGH is a Lecturer in Political Science and Sociology at the National University of Ireland, Galway. He worked previously for INCORE, the Initiative on Conflict Resolution and Ethnicity of the UN University and the University of Ulster. He has been a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley, and at the University of Southern California and is the author of the Internet Research Handbook.