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Politicians and Rhetoric
 
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Politicians and Rhetoric
The Persuasive Power of Metaphor
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
23 Nov 2004
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£74.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403946898
||
 
 
25 Oct 2006
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£26.50
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9780230019812
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Metaphor is vital to the language of political leadership because it mediates between conscious rational ideology and unconscious myth. Drawing on 'corpus linguistics' techniques, this fascinating study of political rhetoric shows how metaphor was used by: Winston Churchill to create a myth of Britain as a heroic warrior; Martin Luther King to create a myth of himself as a messiah; Margaret Thatcher to activate the myth of Boedicia; and George W. Bush to sustain a moral accounting myth that appeals to American ethics. Rhetorical analysis reveals how Bill Clinton used rhetoric to restore his credibility through creating a vulnerable image of moral regeneration, and how Tony Blair developed a conviction rhetoric in which he is a dynamic agent in a mythological struggle between good and evil. Comparisons between these politicians serve to identify the role of metaphor in establishing ethical integrity, and rhetoric heightening emotional impact, policy communication, and in political myth creation.


Description

Metaphor is vital to the language of political leadership because it mediates between conscious rational ideology and unconscious myth. Drawing on 'corpus linguistics' techniques, this fascinating study of political rhetoric shows how metaphor was used by: Winston Churchill to create a myth of Britain as a heroic warrior; Martin Luther King to create a myth of himself as a messiah; Margaret Thatcher to activate the myth of Boedicia; and George W. Bush to sustain a moral accounting myth that appeals to American ethics. Rhetorical analysis reveals how Bill Clinton used rhetoric to restore his credibility through creating a vulnerable image of moral regeneration, and how Tony Blair developed a conviction rhetoric in which he is a dynamic agent in a mythological struggle between good and evil. Comparisons between these politicians serve to identify the role of metaphor in establishing ethical integrity, and rhetoric heightening emotional impact, policy communication, and in political myth creation.


Reviews

'Overall...this book is highly recommended for readers interested in questions of political discourse or language, particularly given its methodological contribution to a field dominated by issues and texts of abstract theorisation.'- Lee Jarvis, Political Studies Review


Contents

Preface
Persuasion, Legitimacy and Leadership
Churchill: Metaphor and Heroic Myth
Martin Luther King: Messianic Myth
Margaret Thatcher and the Myth of Boedicia
Clinton and the Rhetoric of Image Restoration
Tony Blair and Conviction Rhetoric
George W.Bush and the Rhetoric of Moral Accounting
Myth, Metaphor and Leadership
Appendices 1-11: Corpora and Classification of Metaphors
Bibliography
Index


Authors

JONATHAN CHARTERIS-BLACK is Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Surrey, UK. He has published extensively in the areas of figurative language, corpus linguistics, cognitive semantics and English for specific purposes. He is the author of Corpus Approaches to Critical Metaphor Analysis, published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2004.