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Language, Citizenship and Identity in Quebec
 
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Language, Citizenship and Identity in Quebec
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
05 Jan 2007
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£70.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403949752
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26 Aug 2009
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£24.99
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9780230580107
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

The social, political, and economic conditions that accompany globalisation are calling for new conceptualisations of belonging within culturally diverse communities. In Language, Citizenship and Identity in Quebec, the authors take Quebec as a particularly intriguing case study of one such community. They examine how Quebec seeks to foster a sense of belonging among the minorities within its borders through the promotion of a common citizenship, with French as the key element. As a nation without a state, Quebec is driven by two distinct imperatives: the need to affirm a robust Francophone identity within the Anglophone sphere of North America, and the civic obligation to accommodate an increasingly diverse range of migrant groups as well as demands for recognition by Aboriginal and Anglophone minorities. This is the first comprehensive study in English to make a sociolinguistic contribution to the question of Quebec identity, as Quebec defines itself in a globalising world and as it engages with the diversity within its borders.


Description

The social, political, and economic conditions that accompany globalisation are calling for new conceptualisations of belonging within culturally diverse communities. In Language, Citizenship and Identity in Quebec, the authors take Quebec as a particularly intriguing case study of one such community. They examine how Quebec seeks to foster a sense of belonging among the minorities within its borders through the promotion of a common citizenship, with French as the key element. As a nation without a state, Quebec is driven by two distinct imperatives: the need to affirm a robust Francophone identity within the Anglophone sphere of North America, and the civic obligation to accommodate an increasingly diverse range of migrant groups as well as demands for recognition by Aboriginal and Anglophone minorities. This is the first comprehensive study in English to make a sociolinguistic contribution to the question of Quebec identity, as Quebec defines itself in a globalising world and as it engages with the diversity within its borders.


Reviews

Winner of the 2008 Pierre Savard Award from the International Council for Canadian Studies.  For more information about the prize, see http://www.iccs-ciec.ca/pages/newweb/sample2/pierresav_en.asp?shownav=2#1


Contents

List of Tables and Figures
Foreword; G.Bouchard
Acknowledgements
Introduction
PART 1: NEW CHALLENGES
From French Canadian to Quebecer
Redefining the Quebec Nation
Quebec in a Globalising World
PART 2: A COMMON LANGUAGE
French: A Language for All Quebecers
Whose French? Language Attitudes, Linguistic Insecurity and Standardisation
PART 3: DIVERSE EXPERIENCES
Language, Immigration and Belonging in Quebec
Transformations of Anglophone Quebec
Linguistic Rights for Aboriginal Nations
Conclusion
Notes
Appendix
Bibliography
Index


Authors

LEIGH OAKES is Reader in French and Linguistics at Queen Mary, University of London, UK. His research explores questions of language and national identity in Quebec, Sweden, France and the European Union. He has written numerous journal articles and is the author of Language and National Identity: Comparing France and Sweden.

JANE WARREN is Honorary Fellow in the School of Languages and Linguistics at the University of Melbourne, Australia. She has published at the juncture of sociolinguistics and cultural studies, in journals such as Culture, Theory and Critique and French Cultural Studies. She is co-author of the forthcoming monograph Language and Human Relations: Styles of Address in Contemporary Language.