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Linguistic Policies and the Survival of Regional Languages in France and Britain
 
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Linguistic Policies and the Survival of Regional Languages in France and Britain
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
07 Feb 2007
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£76.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403949837
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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Alsatian, Basque, Catalan, Corsican, Western Flemish, Occitan, and various languages such as Picard: what have they got in common, if anything, with Welsh, Scottish Gaelic, Irish, and Cornish? Does Cornish even exist anymore? And is Scots a language? And why is Ulster Scots so important today? These are the kind of questions answered in this book, which examines, first of all, how they were partly or totally destroyed by the emergence of French and English. Each language is examined in the context of the overall policies of France and Britain, reference being made in each case to their historical development and the efforts made today to reinstate them. A comparative approach helps to throw light on unexpected similarities in both countries, and offers therefore much food for thought for those involved in their rehabilitation or working in contexts in which the regional languages play a role (education, administration, tourism, policy making). An understanding of the problems involved is essential for any understanding of the contemporary issues affecting both France and Britain today, particularly in terms of devolution, or, in the case of France, decentralization. A valuable resource and enjoyable reading for both students and researchers.


Description

Alsatian, Basque, Catalan, Corsican, Western Flemish, Occitan, and various languages such as Picard: what have they got in common, if anything, with Welsh, Scottish Gaelic, Irish, and Cornish? Does Cornish even exist anymore? And is Scots a language? And why is Ulster Scots so important today? These are the kind of questions answered in this book, which examines, first of all, how they were partly or totally destroyed by the emergence of French and English. Each language is examined in the context of the overall policies of France and Britain, reference being made in each case to their historical development and the efforts made today to reinstate them. A comparative approach helps to throw light on unexpected similarities in both countries, and offers therefore much food for thought for those involved in their rehabilitation or working in contexts in which the regional languages play a role (education, administration, tourism, policy making). An understanding of the problems involved is essential for any understanding of the contemporary issues affecting both France and Britain today, particularly in terms of devolution, or, in the case of France, decentralization. A valuable resource and enjoyable reading for both students and researchers.


Reviews


'...it will certainly appear on reading lists for my final-year students.' - Robert Blackwood, University of Liverpool, writing in Language Policy
 
'The story is well told, interesting to read and up-to-date. This is a good straightforward account of the situation for each country and RL and to be recommended.' - Dennis Ager, French Studies
 
'... Judge's work is a valuable addition to the Palgrave Studies in Minority Languages and Communities. It should be welcomed as a text for courses in European studies or language planning, and will no doubt be gratefully consulted by many specialist students of French and readers of JFLS.' - Gertrud Aub-Buscher, Journal of French Language Studies


Contents

Acknowledgements
Series Editor's Preface
Introduction
PART 1: THE RISE OF FRENCH AND ENGLISH AND THE DESTRUCTION OF THE REGIONAL LANGUAGES
The Rise of French as an Official National Language
The Rise of English as an Official Language
PART 2: THE REGIONAL LANGUAGE SPOKEN IN METROPOLITAN FRANCE: GENERAL PRESENTATION
Regional Languages Official Elsewhere: Basque, Catalan, Flemish and Alsatian
Regional Languages Not Official Elsewhere: Breton, Corsican, Franco-Provençal, Occitan and the Langues d'oIl
Revitalising the Regional Languages of France
PART 3: THE REGIONAL LANGUAGES OF BRITAIN: GENERAL PRESENTATION
The Regional Languages of England and Wales: Welsh and Cornish
The Regional Languages of Scotland: Scottish Gaelic and Scots
The Regional Languages of Northern Ireland: Irish and Ulster Scots
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index index


Authors

ANNE JUDGE is Professor Emeritus of French and Linguistics at the University of Surrey, UK. She has lectured and published extensively on language and linguistic legislation, originally in relation to France, French within the EU, and the Francophone world, but more recently on linguistic legislation in Britain, finding their similarities and differences both fascinating and enlightening. She is co-author of a history of French style, Stylistic Developments in Literary and Non-Literary French Prose (1995), and is perhaps best known as co-author of A Reference Grammar of Modern French, first published in 1983.