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(Re-)Locating TESOL in an Age of Empire
 
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(Re-)Locating TESOL in an Age of Empire
Edited by Julian Edge
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
19 Apr 2006
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£76.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403985309
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02 Apr 2009
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£24.99
|Paperback Print on Demand
  
9780230580060
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions 
 
 


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DescriptionContentsAuthors

Are TESOL professionals now fairly seen as agents of a new English-speaking empire? Or, if they wish to distance themselves from this role, are there ways of working and living that would make this differentiation clear? Are English speakers set to become the only educated monolinguals in the world and, if so, should we see this as a sign of their affluence or their impoverishment? How many learners of English perceive the major informing culture of the language to be predominantly one of individual depravity and social disintegration? For those who do, how should teachers respond? An international group of authors put forward their differing analyses of the contexts with which they are most familiar, along with proposals for the development of TESOL in a world where military invasion and occupation have been added to the previous mix of globalized economic hegemony and cultural influence exercised by the USA and its allies.


Description

Are TESOL professionals now fairly seen as agents of a new English-speaking empire? Or, if they wish to distance themselves from this role, are there ways of working and living that would make this differentiation clear? Are English speakers set to become the only educated monolinguals in the world and, if so, should we see this as a sign of their affluence or their impoverishment? How many learners of English perceive the major informing culture of the language to be predominantly one of individual depravity and social disintegration? For those who do, how should teachers respond? An international group of authors put forward their differing analyses of the contexts with which they are most familiar, along with proposals for the development of TESOL in a world where military invasion and occupation have been added to the previous mix of globalized economic hegemony and cultural influence exercised by the USA and its allies.


Contents

Notes on the Contributors
Background and Overview; J.Edge
Dangerous Liaison: Globalization, Empire and TESOL; B.Kumaravadivelu
What, Then, Must We Do? Or Who Gets Hurt When We Speak, Write and Teach?; C.Brumfit
Critical Media Awareness: Teaching Resistance to Interpellation; S.Benesch
The (Re-)Framing Process as a Collaborative Locus for Change; B.F.Fabrício & D.Santos
Ideology and Language: Interconnections between Neo-liberalism and English; M.Holborow
Non-judgmental Discourse: Role and Relevance; J.Edge
Teaching Second Languages for National Security Purposes: A Case of Post 9/11 USA; R.Kubota
Equity and English in South African Higher Education: Ambiguity and Colonial Language Legacy; J.Katunich
Negotiating ELT Assumptions in EIL Classrooms; A.Matsuda
Slaves of Sex, Money and Alcohol: (Re-)Locating the Target Culture of TESOL; A.L.Sellami
Neo-imperialism, Evangelism, and ELT: Modernist Missions and a Post-modern Profession; B.Johnston & M.M.Varghese
'The Hedgehog and the Fox': Two Approaches to English for the Military; P.Woods
Index


Authors

JULIAN EDGE is a Lecturer at the University of Manchester, UK, and has worked as an ESOL teacher, teacher educator, researcher and research director in Europe, the Middle East, South East Asia and Australia. His main interest is in teacher development, personal and professional. Among his key publications is Continuing Cooperative Development (2002).