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Figurative Thinking and Foreign Language Learning
 
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Figurative Thinking and Foreign Language Learning
 
 
Palgrave Macmillan
 
 
 
 
 
12 Apr 2006
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£69.00
|Hardback Print on Demand
  
9781403996022
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eBooks ebook on Palgrave Connect ebook available via library subscriptions ebook on ebooks.com 
 
 


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DescriptionReviewsContentsAuthors

Many of the vocabulary items that foreign language learners encounter involve figurative extensions of word meaning. For example, bottleneck, hard-headed, and getting a foot in the door all involve figurative extensions of parts of the body. Although expressions like these are fairly easy for native speakers to understand, they present a particular challenge to foreign language learners. If there is no equivalent in their own language, the understanding and learning of such expressions may involve a degree of figurative thinking. This book examines the nature of figurative thinking, considers its contribution to communicative language ability, and explores the implications for language teaching and learning. In particular, it looks at the contribution that figurative thinking can make to sociolinguistic, illocutionary, textual, grammatical, and strategic competence, as well as vocabulary learning.


Description

Many of the vocabulary items that foreign language learners encounter involve figurative extensions of word meaning. For example, bottleneck, hard-headed, and getting a foot in the door all involve figurative extensions of parts of the body. Although expressions like these are fairly easy for native speakers to understand, they present a particular challenge to foreign language learners. If there is no equivalent in their own language, the understanding and learning of such expressions may involve a degree of figurative thinking. This book examines the nature of figurative thinking, considers its contribution to communicative language ability, and explores the implications for language teaching and learning. In particular, it looks at the contribution that figurative thinking can make to sociolinguistic, illocutionary, textual, grammatical, and strategic competence, as well as vocabulary learning.


Reviews

'This ground-breaking book presents a lucid and persuasive argument for the centrality of figurative thinking in language learning and communicative competence. Contributing to both theory and practice, Jeannette Littlemore and Graham Low help shift language teaching and learning away from a dull emphasis on the transactional. The book is a major addition to a current paradigm shift in language teaching and applied linguistic theory, helping to bring the creative and playful centre stage, and making the task of language learning more fulfilling and rewarding in the process.' - Professor Guy Cook, The Open University, UK


Contents

List of Tables
List of Figures
List of Boxes
Acknowledgements
Introduction
PART 1: FIGURATIVE THINKING
What is 'Figurative Thinking'?
Why is Figurative Thinking Important for Foreign Language Learners?
Psychological Processes Underlying Figurative Thinking
Developing Learner Autonomy in Figurative Thinking
PART 2: FIGURATIVE THINKING AND COMMUNICATIVE LANGUAGE ABILITY
Figurative Thinking and Sociolinguistic Competence
Figurative Thinking and Illocutionary Competence
Figurative Thinking and Textual Competence
Figurative Thinking and Lexico-grammatical Competence
Figurative Thinking and Strategic Competence
PART 3: CONCLUSIONS
Promoting Figurative Language Competence in the Foreign Language Classroom
Notes
References
Index


Authors

JEANNETTE LITTLEMORE is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Birmingham, UK. She has published widely on the teaching and learning of figurative language.

GRAHAM D. LOW is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of York, UK. He is particularly interested in how figurative language is used in written discourse.